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Southern Branches P-Z

Southern Branches P-Z 

A Lennards list of branches totalling 250 from 1931 has been incorporated onto the Southern A-Z of branches. Where Lennards ceased trading a note beside the entry ‘Not Listed in 1931′ has been added if no note exists the branch has been continuously trading for the company.Lennards also began trading extensively in what was once considered Northern Territories, competing against their old partners the Leeds based Public Benefit Boot Company. I have also entered ‘Listed in 1931′ against each branch mentioned on the list. This presents a good inventory of branches under the Lennard banner.

Penzance Green Market circa 1900 wonderful photo

A major project has been to not only establish ‘Then and now’ views of where and when the company traded but also to try and capture as many branches as possible particularly the early branches. In this way we can get some idea of the thinking behind the company strategy. By doing this there have been many surprises both on the Southern side-Lennards, and the Northern Side in the finding of ‘gems’. Using Five main sources to populate the website are:

My own photos,  postcard views, Google Inc. Street views, British Newspaper Archive and Geograph Uk.

Up to circa 1910 and in some cases beyond to 1919 the cross over from Public Benefit Boot company to Lennards Ltd had not been completely achieved regarding the Southern territory branches; originally trading under the common title of Public Benefit Boot Company.

Padstow Cornwall Not Listed in 1931

Duke Street, 1902-1918

Duke Street Cornwall and Devon Post 17th March 1906 an assistant upset a lighted oil lamp used for heating and set fire to the shop. A dairyman nearby and several passersby used a tarpaulin to smother the flames and save the shop.

Padstow, Cross Street, 1919

Paignton Devon 

3 Gerston Place, Torquay Road, 1902-1919

Paignton, 8 Torquay Road, 1929 Listed in 1931

Par Station Cornwall Not listed in 1931

Duke Street, 1914-1919

Penryn, Cornwall close to Falmouth

John Thomas Bray Born 1851 in Leigh, Gloucestershire, it is thought he managed the Public Benefit Boot Co branch at Penryn in 1898 and from 1901 to at least 1913 he managed the boot shop at 19 The Homend, Ledbury, Herefordshire. consult surnames A-D

Henry James Lane 1885 he may have been working at the Swindon branches as one of his children was born there in 1881? In 1895 became manager of Penryn Lower Market Street Branch1897-1901 he managed the 15 Havelock Street branch in Sheffield. 1911 was living at Sunnyside, Hathersage, Derby’s working as a District manager & inspector for a limited company trading in boots and shoes. Henry retired Xmas 1927 having accomplished  42 years as assistant branch manager and inspector. In 1900 he was one of the recipients of a firms’ outing– see above for description

Richard Retallick  Manager of Penryn Branch Lower Market Street 1893

Lower Market Street, 1893-1895 & 1902 Kellys, 1910 

14 Market Street listed in 1931

Pentre, Glamorgan  Rhondda 

201 Ystrad Road Glamorgan Free Press 17th Dec. 1898, & 1900-1907, 1909

Pentre, 206 Ystrad Road, 1911-1920

Pentre, 100 Llewellyn Street, 1926, 1929 listed in 1931

PENZANCE PENZANCE PENZANCE PENZANCE PENZANCE PENZANCE

Penzance, Cornwall   

Penzance Green Market old 1900 newspaper cutting showing how the company converted an old premises occupied by Messrs Rossiter adjoining their branch

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Staff associated with Penzance

William Grant  In 1911 he managed the boot and shoe depot at 2-3 Green Market, Penzance, Cornwall

R.F. Hotham  The Cornish Telegraph April 1906 Mr. R. F. Hotham, of the Public Benefit Boot Company. Penzance, has been awarded second prize for window dressing in the* annual competition, open to Great Britain, organised by the “Boot and Shoe Trades Journal. The prize is a gold medal, supplemented by two guineas by the Nugget Boot Polish Company.

Arthur John Morrish Born 1871 at Bridford, Devon, son of John Morrish, boot maker, and his wife Sophia Joint. He married Ellen Parnell in 1894 and their children included Kenneth Arthur 1902, Betty Winifred 1905 and John Parnell 1909.  1896-1901 he managed the company’s boot shop in Penzance. Later he managed all three shops in Penzance from 1898. Ten years later he was an inspector of branches for the company. He died at Leicester 15 November 1926 aged 55. Consult surnames I-O

Victor George Leonard Morrish Born 1885 at Plymouth, son of John Morrish, boot-maker, and his wife Sophia Joint. At the age of 16 he was a boot trade apprentice based with his brother Arthur at the Public Benefit Boot Co premises in Market Place, Penzance. He married Jane I Lee in 1912 and their children included Kathleen 1913, Geoffrey H 1918 and Alan L 1920. During WWI, he served with the Labour Corps of the Gloucestershire Regiment. He died in 1953 aged 69 and his widow Jane died in 1960 aged 78. Consult surnames I-O

Joseph Reed Assistant at Penzance shop Green Market:     The Cornish Telegraph March 1902 A married woman Hester James of 8 Coulson Place & Beatrice Ellis aged 17 fined for stealing  two pairs of ladies boots and two pairs of childrens boots from the Public Benefit shop in Green Market property of Thomas Lennard and others. Assistant in the shop Joseph Reed of number 4 ST.Clare Street … consult newspaper report from 1902 below

Edgar Willis  Errand boy 1896 Green Market Penzance branch

The Green Market Branch was originally occupied as a single shop this being the half nearest to the pub-‘White Lion’  on the right hand side.. Next door was an old building which the company purchased and converted both buildings into the one seen today, opened in 1907. The building was altered substantially.

The Cornishman Dec 1894 Musical service at Penzance Baptist Chapel. A service was given at the Baptist chapel on Sunday Afternoon when Mr S. Junior rendered a cornet solos, Mr James Truscott a sacred song; While a new and excellent voice was found in that of the manager of the P.B.Boot Co. A most favourable impression was created by this voice and its’ possessor is regarded as a great acquisition to the musical list of Penzance amateurs.

The CornishTelegraph November 1896 Alleged Theft of Boots. -Henry Edwards was charged with stealing two pairs of boots from the Public Benefit boot shop on Saturday evening.—Mr Morrish, manager, said was in his shop on Saturday evening about five o’clock a gentleman came in and told him that someone had taken a pair or boots from outside the shop. He and the boy went out, and the latter caught the prisoner and took the boots from him. The prisoner was wearing one pair and carrying the other.—The boy Wills, in the last witness employ, also gave evidence. —Superintendent- Nicholas said went to the prisoner’s house in New Street and charged him but said he knew nothing about the boots. He (witness) searched the house and (found a pair of boots behind some rubbish in a corner, which Mr Morrish recognised as hie property. He asked that prisoner should be remanded until to-morrow as he had a further charge to bring against him.—Prisoner was remanded until 10. 15 tomorrow morning.  Henry Edwards was brought up on remand from yesterday charged with stealing two pair of boots from the shop of the Public Benefit Company. Prisoner pleaded and said he was sorry for what had done, and would take care it did not happen again.—Mr Julyan said prisoner had pleaded guilty and the Bench were desirous of taking a lenient view of the case, but only a month ago prisoner bad promised to be better. The prisoner would be sent to Bodmin Jail for one month with hard labour. He should like to say a word about shopkeepers hanging goods outside their shops which could be easily taken away, and the sooner this was stopped the better it would be.

Cornishman June 1898 A Mr Taylor riding a De Dion motor tricycle whilst negotiating the route through Penzance lost control close to the Public Benefit Boot shop narrowly missing the plate glass windows and landing in the doorway. No damage was done other than to scatter a show case of boot polishes etc.

Penzance Cornishman Telegraph September 1898 THEFTS FROM SHOPS PENZANCE. LENIENCY Of THE BENCH. Warning to  SHOPKEEPERS. the Guildhall Monday Charlotte Price was brought up before the Mayor (Alderman W. H. Julyan) and Alderman Carne, charged with stealing two pairs of shoes value on Saturday night, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, Limited, and she was further charged with stealing on the same day one man’s shirt, value Is, the property of Edwin Broad, Market Place. Arthur John Morrish, manager of the Public Benefit Boot Company’s shops Penzance, stated the hoots (produced) were hung outside the shop in the Green Market. They were missing between 8 and 9 on Saturday evening. Alfred George Ellis, sailor, now engaged in hawking fruit, said on Saturday evening he was selling fruit in the Market Place. About 9.30 he saw the prisoner throw two pairs of shoes under his handcart. She was then in custody. Witness picked the shoes up, and shortly afterwards he handed them to the witness. He could not swear to the shoes produced, but they were something like them. Morrish, recalled, said he went round to Market Place and saw Ellis with the shoes. He told Ellis to give them to him, and he would hand them over to the police, which he did. P.C. Bicknell, sworn, said he was on duty at 9.30 in the Market-place when he saw the prisoner acting m a suspicious manner outside the boot shop and he saw her take something and put it under her cape. She went away and later he arrested her on another charge. As he was bringing her to the station when, in the Market-place, she threw two pairs of shoes under Ellis’ handcart. When she was charged with stealing two pairs of shoes she said : It’s not so bad to steal two pairs of shoes as it is to steal a bicycle.” The second charge was then taken. Albert George Hawker, manager of Mr Broad’s establishment in Penzance, stated on Saturday night a number of shirts were hung outside the shop door. He believed the shirt produced was the one that was lost, but he could not swear to the shirt. Albert Luke, a fruit hawker, said he was selling fruit 9.30 on Saturday near Broad’s shop. He saw the prisoner walk away from the shop window with shirt. He did not see the woman take the shirt. The shirt produced was something like the one she had. P.C. Bicknell said he saw prisoner to Mr Broad’s shop and look some shirts. She went away and came back shortly afterwards and he saw her snatch the shirt (produced) and whip it up under her cape. He saw her trying to get up through Beare’s-passage, when he stopped her and arrested her. When charged she said : You’ve done me.” Prisoner elected to have the case dealt with summarily. She pleaded guilty and asked the Bench to have mercy on her. She was very sorry and was the worse for drink. She had four young children. She would never drink again. The devil must have been her when she did it.—The husband was in Court and kept making interruptions, and prisoner said if it had not been for him she would not have done it. After consideration the Bench decided to fine the prisoner 5s in each case, the Mayor remarking on the temptation which was placed in people’s way through the shopkeepers hanging goods outside their premises. In his opinion this practice constituted a direct inducement to anybody to steal. It was a very bad practice and he should not take so serious a view of any cases which were brought before him of persons stealing goods which were so exposed. The prisoner was given a fortnight to pay the fines in. .

The Cornish Telegraph March 1902 A married woman Hester James of 8 Coulson Place & Beatrice Ellis aged 17 fined for stealing  two pairs of ladies boots and two pairs of childrens boots from the Public Benefit shop in Green Market property of Thomas Lennard and others. Assistant in the shop Joseph Reed of number 4 ST.Clare Street found empty boxes in the shop after he had served the two women. He was able to identify two pairs which he missed and two pairs of childrens’ shoes which he didn’t miss! (A long winded account but elder woman was fined £1 and costs and the other 2/6d in each case

The Cornish Telegraph April 1906 Mr. R. F. Hotham, of the Public Benefit Boot Company. Penzance, has been awarded second prize for window dressing in the* annual competition, open to Great Britain, organised by the “Boot and Shoe Trades Journal. The prize is a gold medal, supplemented by two guineas by the Nugget Boot Polish Company.

The Cornish Telegraph Oct 1907 Penzance council reporting on the extension to the Green Market shop belonging to Public Benefit Boot Company described it as ‘Charity’ and another councillor used the word ‘scandalous’ at the position of the shop. Earlier in June it was revealed the council could have bought the land the Public Benefit Boot branch in Green Market was on for a nominal cost but failed to do so.In which case they could not enforce their demands that the shop be pushed back. Instead it was built and in its’ present location restricting the pavement access

West Briton and Cornwall Adv. March 1907 Whilst at work on the Company’s new buildings in the green Market Richard Trembath accidentally fell from scaffolding from about thirty feet in height. Suffering from concussion and fractured right shoulder.

Cornish telegraph 24th January & 11th April 1895 branches listed include Penzance           

Penzance, 1-3 Green Market, 1897-c1955 Kellys 

Penzance Cornishman 3-04-06-1924 Penzance Rotarian 1898 recollections

Penzance, 26 Market Place, 1902-1906 Kellys 

Penzance West Briton and Cornwall Advertiser 03-1907 new shop Green Market Penzance, Lennards Corner, The Green Market, 1938

How the scene looks today taken in 2002

Penzance Royal Cornwall gazette 8th December 1898 Penzance has been added to: The Green Market & Market hall followed by Market Place. 

Penzance Cornishman 28-05-1924 Future of Penzance P.B. shop frontage concerns

Lennards Corner The Green Market listed in 1931 & 1945 & 1950 (Newspapers)

Penzance, 1945

Pershore, Worcestershire

 14 High Street, 1929 listed in 1931

Peterborough Northampton

7 Market Place, (S side), 1908-1914

Peterborough, 41 Narrow Bridge Street, 1913-1928

Peterborough, 41 Westgate, 1 Long Causeway, 1926-1927

Peterborough, Market Place, 1928-1929 Listed in 1931

Plymouth, Devon 

Exeter and Plymouth gazette Jan 1904 A Stonehouse Case. William Smith, 28, harness maker, pleaded not guilty to stealing a pair of shoes the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, Ltd., East Stonehouse December 16th. Mr. Pridham Wippell prosecuted. Prisoner. against whom, was stated, there were ten previous convictions, was Sentenced to six months’ hard labour.

Western Evening Herald June 1909 MAN REMANDED AT PLYMOUTH. George Gibbons, described as of no occupation and no fixed abode, was charged with stealing a pair of boots, valued at 4s 11d the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, 82, Old Town Street, on Friday. Aubrey Churchill Spencer assistant at the company’s  branch 82 Old Town-street, deposed to placing the boots, with several other pairs, on a rod outside the shop yesterday morning. In the evening he found one pair was missing. P.C. Pearce deposed to charging the prisoner at the Central Police Station. Can’t you see your way clear in not bringing this in court if I square up with the people?” was the prisoners’  only comment. At this stage a remand till Monday ordered.

Western daily Mercury June 1912 THIEF DETECTED FROM A STONEHOUSE TRAMCAR. A tramp named Robert Owen was brought up on remand at the Stonehouse Petty Sessions yesterday, charged with stealing a pair of shoes from the Public Benefit Boot Company. Evidence was given by Samuel Pascoe an ex constable of the Metropolitan Police, who detected the prisoner from the top of a tramcar. There was a further charge of stealing a pair of trousers from Mr. R. S. Tuttle, Union-street. P.C. Berry gave evidence, and the prisoner, who pleaded guilty, was sentenced to a month’s imprisonment on each charge, to run concurrently. The magistrates commended the action of Mr. Pascoe and two men who assisted in the arrest, Messrs. Fielder and Marshall, for their public spirited action

Cornishman 31st May 1894 adv. Plymouth Branch 87 Union Street, 1895-1914 (East Stonehouse) Lennard Brothers

12 Tavistock Street Devonport  1895-1898 Wm Lennard Boot maker manager up to 1898

Plymouth 9 Union Street, 1896-1919

Plymouth, 22 Tavistock Road, 1919

Plymouth, 98 Old Town Street, 1929

Plymouth, 152 King Street, 1900-1929 Listed in 1931

Plymouth, 82 Old Town Street, 1900-Listed in 1931 and confirmed Kellys 1938 & 1940 (newspapers)

Sophia Joint  she married John Morrish, boot maker. Following his death at Plymouth in 1890 aged 42, she managed the Public Benefit Boot Co premises at 152 King Street, Plymouth for several decades Consult surnames I-O

John Morrish Born 1847 at Holcombe Burnell, Devon, son of Samuel Morrish, shoe maker, and his wife Salome. He married Sophia Joint in 1869 at Exeter and their children included Arthur John  1871, Florence Lydia  1872, William Henry  1873, Lily Sophia  1879, Walter Herbert  1883 and Victor George Leonard  1885. John worked firstly as a boot-maker in Bridford and later in Plymouth where it is thought he worked for the Public Benefit Boot Co. Following John’s death in early 1890, his widow Sophia took over the management of the Public Benefit Boot Co premises at 152 King Street, Plymouth, continuing in that role for more than 20 years.  Sophia died at Leicester in 1931 aged 81. Consult surnames I-O

Walter Herbert Morrish Born 1883 at Plymouth, son of John Morrish, boot maker, and his wife Sophia Joint. At the age of 17 he assisted his mother who was manageress of the Public Benefit Boot Co branch at 152 King Street, Plymouth. In 1918 he married Elsie M Short and their children included Claud F Morrish 1925 and Doreen M S Morrish 1926. He died in 1956 aged 73. Consult surnames I-O

William James Moss  Born 1878 at Cheltenham. In 1901 he worked as an assistant in the boot shop in Yeovil, Somerset, and in 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 9 Union Street, Plymouth, Devon.Consult surnames I-O

Frederick Frank Puddicombe
Born 1890 at Torquay, Devon, son of Philip Puddicombe, farrier, and his wife Alice Jane West. At the age of 21 he worked as a shop assistant, along with his cousin Horace John Rugg, at the Public Benefit Boot Co premises, 74 King Gardens, Plymouth, Devon. He died in 1914 aged 24.

Francis Parker Ravenor Born 1875 at Lymington, Hampshire, son of Henry Charles Ravenor. At the age of 17 circa 1892 he worked as a boot shop assistant in Newbury, Berkshire, and from at least 1901 until 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 82 Old Town Street, Plymouth, Devon. He died at Plymouth in 1939 . consult surnames P-S

Horace John Rugg Born 1891 at Exeter, Devon, at the age of 19 he, along with his cousin Frederick Puddicombe, worked as shop assistants at the Public Benefit Boot Co premises at Plymouth, Devon.

Aubrey Churchill Spencer Assistant at 82 Old Street Plymouth.    Western Evening Herald June 1909 MAN REMANDED AT PLYMOUTH. George Gibbons, described as of no occupation and no fixed abode, was charged with stealing a pair of boots, valued at 4s 11d the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, 82, Old Town Street, on Friday….Consult Plymouth Southern branches P-Z for the full story

Pontefract Added from 1931 List

Lennards Corner 1 Market place listed in 1931

Pontypridd, Glamorgan

Pontypridd Market street c. 1900

Free Press 23 Market Square & Taff Street (1 Branch) 17th Dec 1898

Glamorgan Free Press July 1899 Sarah Jane Wetherall, Tram-side Pontypridd, a middle aged woman and four girls and two boys were charged stealing  boots, sunshades and dress material from Public Benefit Boot, Mr F. G. Edwards shop and Messrs Hughes and Jones drapery establishment. The boots had been pledged at a pawnbrokers. Wetherall was committed for 21 days on each of the three charges and the youngsters bound over to come up for judgement.

Pontypridd 9 Taff Street, 1900

Pontypridd, 23 Market Square, & 6 B Taff Street 1901-1926 (1 Branch fronts and backs two streets) and on the Market Street side it is opposite Church Street

6B Taff Street Listed in 1931

Western Times 1940’s throughout 6B Taff Street

Poole,

139 High Street, 1899-1916 close to the cathedral

Poole, 140 High Street, 1929 listed in 1931 close to the railway station

Port Talbot, Glamorgan 

1 Station Road, 1920 1926 Kellys’

Port Talbot, 64 Station Road, 1929 listed in 1931

W.B.Martin  Assistant Station Road Port Talbot WOUNDED AND MISSING: Mrs. Martin, 21. Blenheim Road, Gloucester has received officiaL notification from the War Office that her husband, Pte. W. B. Martin, Welsh Guards, has been reported wounded and now missing since an engagement in France on September 16th. Previous to enlistment was employed by Lennards Ltd., Station Road, Port Talbot   Gloucestershire Chronicle November 1916 

Porth

58 Hannah Street South Wales News 13th July 1885 

Porth, Glamorgan

9 Station Street, 1926, 1929  listed in 1931

Portsmouth

Portsmouth evening News June 1897 Rose Mintrum. 33. was charged with stealing from the outside of no. 273. Commercial Road Landport, three pairs of shoes, value 14s. 10d the property of  Thomas James Lennox. trading as the Public “Benefit Boot Company. The articles were displayed outside the shop on Tuesday, and missed the next day, when prisoner tried to pawn them at Cudlipp’s, Church-path, but was given in charge by the assistant. —Prisoner said she bought the boots, and  the case was adjourned for a week to enable her to call witnesses, bail was allowed. (this was in all likelihood a franchise shop)

Portsmouth Evening News Oct 1901  TO THE SESSIONS. Frank Hiscox, 21, and Walter Sketchley, 24. Royal Field Artillerymen, were charged with the burglary of five odd boots and one shoe, value £1 8s. 4d., the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, 273 and 275, Commercial-road. —It appeared that the theft took place midnight yesterday, the articles being from breaking the shop window. P.C. Perkins saw the men immediately after, by All Saints’ Church, and noticing that their tunics were bulky he accosted them and found the boots concealed beneath. As they passed the shop on the way to the police station Hiscox obligingly remarked it was there that he stole the boots.— Prisoners were committed to the Quarter sessions

Hampshire Telegraph April 1903 CHARGE OF THEFT WITHDRAWN. Ellen Robinson, a young woman, who appeared in the dock with a baby in her arms, was charged with the theft of a pair of shoes belonging to Messrs. Leonard and Leonard, trading as the Public Benefit Boot Company, of Commercial-road, Landport.—Prisoner, it appeared, bought a pair of boots at the shop, and another pair were missed. She was arrested in the street by P.C. Thompson. Her husband said his wife had been strange in her manner since her confinement a month ago. She could have no use for the shoes she stole. —Upon hearing this the prosecution withdrew the charge, and the woman left the court in the company of her husband

Portsmouth Evening News Sept 1904 Arthur Wright 22 a printer admitted being drunk on Commercial Road on Saturday evening.He did not remember assaulting Mr Scott of the Public Benefit Boot shop in Commercial road when asked why he was loitering outside the shop. He swore and struck him under the chin. Fined 10s

Portsmouth E. News 08-11-1892 Early Closing Mutual Boot Stores Commercial Road (A Lennard bros. registered trading company

PORTSMOUTH  & Landport 

This Branch traded under Mutual Boot Stores a Lennard Bros. trade-name. 373-375 Commercial Road, 1894  confirmed Hampshire library Kellys  Telegraph Area redeveloped vacated circa 1903 (Hampshire Telegraph October 1903 the premises are being sold off

Portsmouth, 155-157 Commercial Road, Landport (cnr Meadow Street) 1906-1923

Portsmouth, 193 Commercial Road, 1924-1927                                                           

Portsmouth, 147 Commercial Road, 1928- listed in 1931 and confirmed Kellys 1936                                                                       

Portsmouth, 179 Commercial Road, Portsmouth Evening News 20th April 1937 and re-opened in 1940? 

57 Kings Road, 1918-1940

John Joseph Hatch In 1911 he worked as a boot shop assistant at the company’s Portsmouth premises. He was K.I.A. on the Somme consult Surnames E-H

Thomas James Lennox  Portsmouth evening News June 1897 Rose Mintrum. 33. was charged with stealing from the outside of no. 273. Commercial Road Landport, three pairs of shoes, value 14s. 10d the property of  Thomas James Lennox. trading as the Public “Benefit Boot Company….Probably a franchisee for the full story Consult Portsmouth Southern branches P-Z

William Scott Born c1859 at Pensher, Co Durham, son of George Atkinson SCOTT, grocer’s assistant, and his wife Margaret MARRINER. He married Sarah Jane PATTERSON in 1882 and they had six children including Bertrand Patterson SCOTT 1883, Ruby SCOTT 1886, Mabel SCOTT c1888, Claude William SCOTT 1890 and Walter SCOTT 1894. He worked in boot shops in Bishop Auckland, Bristol and in 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 155-157 Commercial Road, Landport, Portsmouth, Hampshire. consult surnames P-S In 1904 as an assistant in Portsmouth William Scott was assaulted

William  Scott  Assistant. Portsmouth Evening News Sept 1904 Arthur Wright 22 a printer admitted being drunk on Commercial Road on Saturday evening.He did not remember assaulting Mr Scott of the Public Benefit Boot shop in Commercial road when asked why he was loitering outside the shop. He swore and struck him under the chin. Fined 10s

Ramsgate, Kent 

52 High Street, 1929 listed in 1931

Reading  

Berkshire Chronicle May 1905 Theft of Boots. John Whitaker, of no fixed abode, was charged with stealing the 29th ult. pair of boots value ??, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, Limited.—John Davis, a porter in the employ of the prosecutors, said on Saturday about 9.15 p.m. the prisoner walked to the doorway the shop and took the pair of boots (produced) which hung there. he was coming out to the pavement when witness caught him. The boots were concealed under his coat, and when witness accused him of the theft said he required a pair.”—The prisoner now stated that he was looking for work, having walked from Manchester. No one would employ him owing to his appearance. The magistrates sentenced him to 14 days hard labour.

Berkshire Chronicle July 1908 Two girls accused of stealing boots from the Reading the temporary shop 27 Broad Street: The case against two girls, Ellen Harradene, of Hill Street, and Mary Critchett, Pearl Court, charged with stealing a pair boots, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, was adjourned-for a week, as the girls alleged they were sent out for the boots by another person

Reading Mercury June 1917  tribunals: Mr. E. T. Halt appeared for W. B. Wane, 32, B1, manager of Lennard’s. Ltd., Reading.—He was given three months, with leave, on domestic grounds, conditional on joining the Volunteer Defence Force

Reading Mercury December 1898 90 Broad street

Reading Berkshire Chronicle 16th November 1901 announce 2 branches 27 & 90 Broad street.

Reading 27 Broad Street temporary branch until the emporium on the exact opposite of the road is prepared at number 90

Reading 27 Broad Street, 1899-1903 Temporary premises from 1899-1909 whilst number 90 Broad Street was being rebuilt. 

 Reading, 28 & 29 Broad Street c1905 (company was occupying 27-29 Broad Street at this time)

 Reading, 90 Broad Street, & 26, 28 Queen Victoria Street (Corner of Broad Street)  1899-1916 

Completely rebuilt and opened in 1909

Reading, 95 Broad Street, 1916-1929 listed in 1931 (further expansion follows)

Reading, 25 Whitley Street (E side), 1911-1915 & 1918 

6 King Street 1918 & 1924 Kelly’s Berkshire

John Davis A porter at the temporary premises number 27 Broad Street at reading: Berkshire Chronicle May 1905 … For the complete story consult Reading Southern Branches P-Z

Ernest Edward Rhodes Born 1887 at Gravesend, Kent, son of Richard Thomas Rhodes, steam tug engine driver, and his wife Caroline Lamburn Raspison. In 1911 he worked as an assistant at the company’s premises at 25 Whitley Street, Reading, Berkshire. At the time his brother Richard managed the store.

Richard Charles Rhodes Born 1876 at Gravesend, Kent, son of Richard Thomas Rhodes. In 1901 he is a lodger in Ashdown Road Kingston on Thames, Surrey listed as single and a Boot salesman. and by 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 25 Whitley Street, Reading, Berkshire. His younger brother Ernest at the time worked as an assistant in the same store.consult surnames P-S

W.B.Wane Reading Mercury June 1917  tribunals: Mr. E. T. Halt appeared for W. B. Wane, 32, B1, manager of Lennard’s. Ltd., Reading.—He was given three months, with leave, on domestic grounds, conditional on joining the Volunteer Defence Force consult surnames T-Z

Redfield, Gloucestershire Not Listed in 1931

261 Church Road, 1929

Redruth Cornwall

Redruth 82 Fore Street new branch opening ceremony

Cornubian & Redruth Times May 1893 Pub Benefit. 38 and a half Fore Street Redruth new branch.PUBLIC BENEFIT BOOT COMPANY Have Won their Fame in Battle. The Largest Towns in England ring with their praise for the Benefits they have conferred upon the Public. Rally Round the Company To-day. .

Cornish Telegraph November 1895 Stealing Shoes at Redruth.—Sarah Hullen domestic servant 19, was charged with stealing a pair of boots from the Public Benefit Boot Co., value 2s 11d on Friday last. Prisoner pleaded guilty —Sydney Hugo, in the employ of the Public Benefit Boot Company, said he received information from Mr Grose that a pair of boots had been stolen, and on going into the street he saw the prisoner talking to Mrs Edwards, and when he came she gave up the boots. He then informed the police. —John Grose said he saw the prisoner help herself a pair of shoes and go off. He then informed Uglow.—Mrs Edwards also gave evidence.—Sergeant Nicholls said on Friday he received information about the pair of shoes, and when he taxed the prisoner about it she said she was not out that night and did not take them, but afterwards confessed.—The Chairman said it was a sad thing for a young girl in service to give way like that. As this was the first offence and her mistress gave her a good character, she would be bound over to come up for judgment when called upon

The Cornish Telegraph March 1902 ST. DAY WIDOWS FIRST OFFENCE. Mary Ann Metherhead, of St. Day, widow, with five children was charged with stealing February 14th. a parcel containing an astrican cape, Is. and another parcel containing one pair of boots value 2s 3d. and pair of slippers, worth Is lld. Inspector Smallcombe said the parcels were left in the Perranporth ’bus at Redruth, and when the owners returned were missing. On the same day defendant went into the Public Benefit Boot Company’s shop and changed a pair of boots and a pair of slippers. Suspicion fell on her, in consequence, and witnesses went to her house and found the missing cape. When served with the summons defendant admitted that she had stolen the articles. Defendant pleaded guilty, but said she took the things without thinking. The Bench bound defendant over in her own recognisances to come for judgment when called upon.

Cornubian and Redruth times May 1906 Theft of Shoes at Redruth. Mary Miller, of Stithians, was charged with stealing a pair of shoes from the Redruth Branch of the Public; Benefit Boot Company Friday last, valued at 2a. id. Frederick Halse, manager of the Public Benefit Boot Co. Redruth, deposed that, about 12.40 p.m. Friday the accused came the shop and made a purchase of two pairs of shoos. Some time after she left be missed a pair of shoes, from the wall of the ladies’ fitting room. He had seen them there during the morning and gave information to Inspector Wright, and later pointed out the defendant to the inspector and P.C. Kingdom as being a person who had visited the shop, subsequently P.C. Kingdom brought the pair of shoes produced which he identified as the pair he had missed. P.C. Kingdom deposed that at about 5.30 p.m. the previous Friday he saw the defendant in the Stithians ‘bus which was about leave. She admitted having been to Public Benefit Boot Company and made a couple of purchases, and produced a parcel in which were the goods she had paid for. Afterwards, however, be found shoes produced on her little girl, the old ones being in a basket which the defendant had. She then admitted taking the shoes, and offered to pay any money. Defendant pleaded guilty, and said she did not think she was responsible for her actions in her present condition. Defendant’s husband also pleaded for leniency for the sake his wife and the little children. Defendant was ordered to pay the costs, amounting to 18s

Redruth, 38 Fore Street, 1893-1906 Still Public Benefit

Alfred Charles Ball Manager of 82 Fore street Redruth many years prior to WW1

Western Morning news two women who went on a stealing spree were reported in the newspaper of stealing four pairs of boots from The public benefit Boot shop Mr P. H. Halls was the manager. The women stole so much that they were sentenced to 2 months hard labour on each case amounting to six months. one of them had five children her husband was a miner. Consult Surnames E-H for full biographical details

Frederick Henry Halse Consult 1906 court case above confirming Managership in 1906 & surnames E-H confirmed he was found in the 1911 census at Redruth

Sidney Hugo consult Surnames E-H for full biographical details

Wesley Nancarrow Born 1865 at Summercourt, St Enoder, Cornwall. 1906 he managed the Public Benefit Boot Co branch in Honey Street, Bodmin. By 1914 he managed businesses in Wadebridge and Redruth. consult surnames I-O

Harry Teague
Born 1893 at Redruth, Cornwall, son of John Teague, tin miner, and his wife Susan Ann Penglase. In 1911 he worked as a boot shop assistant at the company’s premises in Redruth. He served in WWI and died in Cornwall in 1933 aged 40.

Redruth, 82 Fore Street, 1906-listed in 1931  as Lennards Ltd also  confirmed 1938, 1954

Rochester

Henry Leopold Durham Born 1885 at Bredenbury, 1901 he worked as an apprentice to John James TYLER, manager of the Public Benefit Boot Co branch at 161 Cricklade Street, Cirencester. In 1911 he worked as a boot trade manager in Rochford, Essex. Consult surnames A-D

Rugby Warwickshire 

Nuneaton Advertiser Jan 1894  Advertising and the address of the branch is Ceylon Buildings Chapel Street Rugby 

Rugby Advertiser Dec 1896 George Sparks Essex Street Rugby stole boots from Public Benefit Boot Company. Commitment for eight days but suspended if agreed to pay 4s per month

8, Chapel Street, 1896- 1909 (8 Chapel St) 1912-1914 (extended to 7&8) 1916 back to (8)

Rugby, Lennards Corner, Regent Street/Church Street 1920 &  1929-Listed in 1931 confirmed 1947 & 1957(newspapers)

Man fined for smashing window in the Lennards Shoes branch at Rugby 27 July 1977

Samuel Aston 
Born 1890 at Bannell, Flintshire, Wales, son of Thomas ASTON and his wife Maria JONES. In 1911 he worked as a boot shop assistant at the company’s premises in Rugby, Warwickshire. He served in WWI and afterwards married Amy MILLS. He died at Manchester in 1951 aged 61. Consult Surnames A-D for full biographical details

Samuel Burton managed the Public Benefit Boot Co shop in Rugby, circa 1896 He was a brother-in-law of the Coventry boot dealer Samuel Harker consult surnames A-D

Runcorn, Cheshire 1905

Winsford & Middlewich guardian Sept 1910  Auction of freehold premises being number 4, High-Street, Runcorn, in the occupation of Mr. Samuel Coventry, tailor. All that FREEHOLD SHOP. 6, High-street. Runcorn, in the occupation  of the Public Benefit Boot Company and Mr. ‘Samuel Coventry. Freehold Shop  number 8, High-Street, Runcorn, in the occupation  of Black and White,’ tea dealers. Commodious business premises in the principal shopping portion of the town. The total  net rental of the 3 shops is £92.10s

Advert from 1910 above shows P.B.B.Co is occupying 6 High Street and sharing the same with a tailor.

Runcorn, 42 Church Street, 1914

46 Church Street confirmed 1934 Kellys

47 Church Street listed in 1931

Salford, Lancashire, See Manchester

SALISBURY SALISBURY SALISBURY SALISBURY SALISBURY SALISBURY

Salisbury, Wiltshire 

Salisbury Times Dec 1905 Boots Outside Shops. Herbert Gibson was charged on remand with stealing a pair of boots. George Eddy, salesman employed by the Public Benefit Boot Company, of 16, Catherine Street, said on Saturday evening, shortly after eight o’clock, he missed a pair of boots from the front of the shop. afterwards he attended the Police Station and identified the boots, which now produced, and valued at 4s. 11d. P.C. Tucker said that at about 8.20 on Saturday evening, when on duty in Catherine Street, he met defendant carrying something bulky under hie coat. asked him what he had, and replied, “A pair of boots,” which he showed him, and said he should not tell how be came into possession of them. He cautioned defendant and charged him with stealing the boots, when he replied, I may as well tell you how 1 got them—’l stole them.” Witness then took him into custody. Defendant had nothing to say and was committed for trial at the Quartet Sessions

Salisbury & Winchester journal 1906 DISTRESSING SUICIDE AT SALISBURY.  A distressing tragedy occurred at Sunday evening. About five o’clock, Mr. G. Eddy, manager of the Public Benefit Boot Company’s premises in Catherine Street, was summoned by the servant at No. 18, Catherine.Street to Mr. Walter Clarke, who in March last opened a milliner’s and drapery business under the name of Mrs Marguerite. He found him lying in a pool of blood in a shed at the rear of the shop, in an unconscious condition, suffering from a revolver -Shot wound in the head. Mr. Eddy at once summoned the police and medical aid, and Dr. Ord and Dr. Fison were soon in attendance. Everything possible was done foe the unfortunate man. but otter lingering for just over an hour and half, he died. Mr. Clarke, who is said to have come from Aldershot, was 51 years of age, and he leaves a widow and several grown-up children. The inquest revealed that Mr Clarke often complained of pains in the head and unusually he expressed the wish to his wife that should he die he would like a post mortem examination to establish if there was something wrong with his brain. He was found initially by Annie Wheeler the domestic servant employed by Mrs Clarke.Verdict Suicide whilst of unsound mind. 

Hampshire Chronicle Sept 1907 Salisbury Shop Manager Ruined Betting. —At the Salisbury City Petty Sessions on Monday George Henry Semmens’ Eddy, manager the Public Benefit Boot Company, 16, Catherine Street Salisbury, was brought up on remand charged with stealing £128 4s. 6d., the moneys of the Company, between April and September of this year. Mr. Brown, one the inspectors for the Public Benefit Boot Company, stated that on September he called on Eddy, and found the prisoner and his wife in tears. He asked them what was the matter, and he said My stock will be short; the money has gone in betting.” Witness went through the stock, and found it short a sum of £128 4s. He asked what he had done with the money, and he said I have been backing horses.” The prisoner had since told him that he had been taking the money out of the till, and that he had been only doing this sort of thing this year. Up to April of last year the prisoner’s accounts had always been in order, and he was one of the best men in the firm’s employ. He had the confidence of the directors and the inspectors, so much that they would have allowed him take stock himself, and would have taken his word for it. The prisoner told him that he had paid the money to two bookmakers in the city, and that when they came into the shop they had seen him take the money out of the till to pay them. A letter from the Managing Director the prosecuting firm handed to the Bench, which stated that the prosecution was brought in order that it might be a warning to others. The Company were aware that the prisoner had got into the hands of bookmakers. They hoped that the Bench would inflict as lenient a punishment on the prisoner as possible. Up to this time Eddy had borne an exemplary character, and when he had undergone whatever punishment the Bench thought fit to inflict the Company were prepared to find him employment. The magistrates gave a penalty of five months with hard labour to serve as a deterrent to others to give up this pernicious habit which was doing so much damage to them socially and morally

Salisbury Times Feb 1909 A Story of Some Ladles’ Shoes. Sidney Plank (20), of Water Street, Bulford, was charged with obtaining three pairs of shoes by false pretences from Messrs. Moore Bros., of the total value of£1. 1s. 9d. Charles Crook, labourer, of 67, Winchester Street, said that on market days he ran errands for the carriers. On Saturday he received instructions from Mr. Witchell to go the Public Benefit Boot shop in Catherine Street, leave a parcel, and pay a bill for 6s 11d. The manager confirmed it was 6s. lid., so witness gave him half a sovereign and received the change with a receipt. He did not open the receipt. Frederick Newberry, of 2, Egerton Place, Windsor Road, assistant to Messrs. Moore Bros., boot manufacturers, Silver Street, stated that the defendant went to their shop on Saturday afternoon and handed in an order for ladies’ shoes written on a piece of red paper. Witness saw him hand it to a young lady assistant, saying, “They are for Mr. Witchell, the carrier.” Witness packed up three pairs of shoes (produced) valued respectively 5s. 11d., 6s. 11d., and 8s. 11d., and defendant took them away. Witness was called to Mr. Sewell’s pawnbroker’s shop the same evening at 7 o’clock, and defendant was there with the shoes which he said he wanted to pawn because he did not want to have to walk back to Bulford. Mr. Witched frequently sent orders to Mr. Moore’s shop. Charles Sewell, pawnbroker, 21, Milford Street, stated that the defendant came to his pledge office about 7 o’clock on Saturday evening and brought the three pair of shoes (produced). Witness asked how much be wanted on them and be replied, “ Ten shillings.” Witness further asked where got them from, and said bought them at Moore’s that afternoon for a guinea. Not being satisfied witness sent to Messrs. Moore’s shop to enquire if they had sold them and the last witness came to his office and stated that a man took the shoes that afternoon for Mr. Witchell, the earner. Witness then gave information to the police. Frederick William Witchell, carrier of Dorrington, said that he received instructions to give an order to the Public Benefit Boot Company for three pairs of ladies’ shoes. He gave the order, written on red paper, to Crook, with half-a-sovereign to pay an account. Crook brought back the receipt and the red paper. Witness returned to his van at about five minutes to four and found the order had not arrived. While he was looking through the parcels in the van Sidney Plank came up, and witness asked him to go to the Public Benefit shop with the order and see if the shoes bad been packed up. Plank did not return, so witness left for home without the shoes. He did not give defendant Instructions to to Messrs. Moore’s shop to get anything for him, and this was the first time he had asked him to go to the Public Benefit shop get things in his name Walter Bernard Waite, manager the Public Benefit Boot shop in Catherine Street, said that Crook went there Saturday and paid account for Mr. Witchell. Defendant did not go to the shop at any time. After a lengthy deliberation Plank was charged with obtaining goods under false pretences. However he was given the benefit of the doubt by magistrates and dismissed the charge but warned Plank sternly to be very careful f his future conduct. The decision was received with applause in court which was quickly suppressed, as usual

John Henry Semmens Eddy Manager 1905-1907 ending with an embezzlement case see above

 George Hayter Born 1875 at Salisbury. In 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 88 Fisherton Street, Salisbury.

Walter Bernard Waite Manager see above for court case 

Ernest Jesse Keveren Born 1871 at Gloucester. His eldest brother Arthur George Keveren was a boot salesman and Ernest followed him into the trade. In the mid-1890s Ernest was based in Weston-Super-Mare, Somerset and in South Wales; in 1898 he managed the Public Benefit Boot Co shop at 88 Fisherton Street, Salisbury, after which he managed the company premises at The Cross, Worcester.

Walter Bernard Waite Manager see above Salisbury Times 1909
Born 1884 at Upton Loval, Wiltshire, son of Herbert David Waite.  1917. In 1901 he was a boot shop assistant at Frome, Somerset and in 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 16 Catherine Street, Salisbury, Wiltshire consult surnames T-Z

88 Fisherton Street, 1897-8-1929

Salisbury, 16 Catherine Street, 1903-1929 Listed in 1931 

Salisbury,16  Catherine Street, 1903 -1915-1937 Trowbridge Museum and Library

Salisbury, 1945

Scilly Isles Added from 1931 list

Lakes Packet and Cornwall Advertiser March 1908 Daring Robbery at Scilly. On Saturday night, Mr. W. Nance, who keeps a baker’s shop and is also the agent for the Public Benefit Boot Company in the Scilly Isles, closed his premises about 10.30. During the night he heard a door dose, and, going downstairs, discovered that someone had entered the shop and taken all the cash from two tills, amounting to about £40. There was no mark of anyone breaking in, but after Mr. Nance had put the lights out and had supper, he discovered that he had not barred the door. He then went into the shop without a light, and barred the door. It is supposed  someone  entered while the family were at supper at the back of the house, and was probably in hiding when the shop was locked. When the robbery was discovered the door had been opened from the Inside, and the thief had escaped.

The Parade St.Mary’s Street listed in 1931

Mr W. Nance  Lakes Packet and Cornwall Advertiser March 1908 Daring Robbery at Scilly. consult Scilly above for full story

Shirehampton, Gloucestershire Not listed in 1931

High Street, 1929

Shoreditch, Middlesex Not Listed in 1931

125 Shoreditch High Street, 1915

Shrewsbury,

44 Pride Hill, 1891

Shrewsbury, 15 Castle Street, 1922, 1929, 1934  Listed in 1931 confirmed 1939 Shrewsbury Archives

Cornelius John Fenton Born 1862 at Deptford, Kent, son of Richard FENTON, coach maker, and his wife Lucy Stilliard. In 1888 at Wem, Shropshire, he married Hannah CARR and their children included Dorothy Ann  1890, Norah Lucy 1891, Hilda Mary  1893 and Leslie Carr  1895. He worked at various Public Benefit Boot Co branches when he was based at Stroud, Pendleton and (Pride Hill, manager in 1891) Shrewsbury. He died in 1938

Sidmouth Devon

9 Union Street, 1897

Sidmouth 3 High Street, 1929 Listed in 1931  & 1940

Skipton

Harry Samuel Lenton Born 1855 at Northampton. From at least 1891 until 1911 Harry managed the company’s premises at 18 High Street, Stamford and his wife Charlotte assisted in the business. He retired in January 1928 having been manager of the Skipton Branch for 12 years.consult surnames I-O 

SOUTHAMPTON SOUTHAMPTON SOUTHAMPTON SOUTHAMPTON

Southampton, Hampshire Lennards Ltd continuous trading until 1973 at least

Hampshire Advertiser June 1899 George Davis, James Wilkins, and Patrick Driscoll, labourers, were charged with being concerned together in stealing two pairs of boots, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, Bridge-street. On Saturday night the boots were seen outside the shop, hanging up seven feet above, the pavement. P.C. Carter noticed that Davies had a bulky appearance about the pockets, and stopped him and found the boots produced. When, asked to account for them he said he stole them, and that the other two were “in it” and the three men were then arrested.- Davis and Wilkins pleaded guilty, and Driscoll not guilty. There were previous convictions for larceny against Davis, who was sentenced to three months, and the other prisoners to one month’s hard labour

Hampshire Advertiser Dec 1899 LENIENT PROSECUTOR. John Cooper was charged with stealing a pair of boots from the Public Benefit Boot Companys premises, Bridge-street.— Samuel Hawkins, manager, identified the boots as the property of his employers. On Saturday night prisoner and two other men came into the shop and purchased a pair of boots. As he was leaving witness noticed that prisoner looked bulky, and on stopping him he found the boots under his coat. The boots were worth 10s. 6d.— Prisoner pleaded guilty, and said it was all through drink.— Prosecutor did not wish to press the charge.— Fourteen days’ hard labour

Hampshire Advertiser July 1902 SHOP DOOR THEFT. David McMatter. labourer, of no fixed abode, pleaded guilty charge to stealing a pair of boots, to the value of 42 11d., the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, from the doorway of the premises in Bridge-street, Southampton, on Thursday.—The Bench Imposed a fine of 10s. and costs, or 14 days —McMaster said his own boots were done, and he took a pair to wear.—P.C. Gulliver arrested him with the boots in his possession in a public-house, and the manager of the prosecuting company identified the boots

Hampshire Advertiser July 1904 GIRL THIEVES. Elizabeth Cruse and Florence Tubbs, school girls, both of Marsh-lane, were charged with stealing pair lady’s shoes, value 2s. 11d., outside 4. Bridge-street, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, Friday.—P.C. Baker stated that yesterday afternoon he noticed  two girls outside the Public Benefit boot shop in Bridge-street. He saw Cruse take the bools, put them in a perambulator and cover them up. When the girl saw him she ran away, but witness caught her. Cruse said that Tubbs untwisted them and she stole them. other girl said the same. —Prisoners were crying in the dock, but the officer stated that all the morning they bad been larking about.—Albert Hoyle, manager the Company, identified the boots.— Inspector said the prisoners were two notorious little thieves. In March last they stole a waistcoat. When they pawned it they said their uncle had sent them. The girls were discharged promising not do it again. F’our or five times they had been stopped by people, who had seen them stealing things. The aunt of the girl Cruse had received a pair of baby’s boots, and the Inspector showed other pairs other shoes the girl had stolen.—The Chairman said the prisoners would be sent to a reformatory for four years, and expressed to the parents the opinion of the Bench they were a great deal more guilty than their poor unfortunate children. He warned them as to their future conduct

Hampshire Advertiser Nov 1906 SHOLING SEAMAN’S ALLEGED FALSE PRETENCES.  Henry William Marck (43) was Charged by Austin Newnham, of obtaining four pairs of boots of the value of £1 Os. 4d., and money to the amount 9s 8d on October 15th, 1906. There were four other charges against prisoner, of obtaining by pretences,  who appeared for the prosecution. said prisoner had for some time not gone sea. His mode of obtaining goods by false pretences was to buy Seamen’s advance notes from stationers in the town, fill them up himself, and call at the shops of particular tradesmen with whom he had been in the habit of dealing. . Mr. Hiscock concluded by asking the Bench to commit prisoner the sessions after evidence had been given. Austin Newnham said he was manager for the Public Benefit Boot Company, at 137 and 138. St. Mary-street, Southampton and knew prisoner was a customer at the shop. On Monday, October 15th last, prisoner went to the shop about eleven clock in the morning, and asked witness(Mr Newnham) if he would do him a kindness, handing him the note produced. At prisoner’s request the witness cashed it, though he previously informed the prisoner that he never did any business with these notes before, but, knowing the prisoner, he would change it for him. Prisoner replied that it was a genuine thing, and said the witness would receive the money three days after he sailed. Witness was to send it to Messrs. Rea and Co., Bristol, the address on the note. Believing the statements to true, witness supplied him with a pair of boots. Prisoner then said he had to catch a train to Bristol shortly after twelve o’clock, and would send his wife for three or four pairs of boots. His wife would also take the balance of the money. Prisoner added that the usual thing was to allow the tradesman 2s. 6d. for cashing the note. the following day prisoner’s wife went to the shop, and he supplied her with three pairs of boots or shoes. Marck was apprehended at Hull returned to Southampton and referred to the Quarter sessions court.

Bridge Street Mutual Boot Stores Hampshire Advertiser 13-11-1895 (Lennard Bros. Trading company)

137-138 St Mary’s Street (east side, cnr James Street), 1898-1906

Southampton  138 St.Mary’s Street 1906-1915 

Southampton, 4 Bridge Street, 1898-1903  (4 & 5 bridge Street 1903-1915)

Southampton, 11-13 Bernard Street, 1929 Listed in 1931 & 1935

Southampton, 114a East Street, 1929

William Joseph Bush Born 1867 at Shirley, Hampshire. In 1891 he worked as a boot shop assistant in Southampton and from circa 1901 until 1913 he managed the premises at 99 High Street, Winchester consult surnames A-D

George Percy Fry Born 1882 at Southampton son of George James Fry. He managed the company’s premises at 4-5 Bridge Street, Southampton 1911.

Samuel George Hawkins Born 1873 at Maldon. At age 17 he worked as a shop assistant in Taunton and at age 25 he worked as a salesman in the Co premises at 4 & 5 Bridge Street, Southampton 1899.

Thomas Bertie Hedge Born 1876 at Longford, Ireland. Thomas worked as a boot shop assistant at Maidstone, Kent. From circa 1911 until 1914,  he managed the company’s premises at 137-138 St Mary’s Street, Southampton consult surnames E-H for more detail

Albert Hoyle Born 1879 at Bridgwater. He worked for some time at Southampton found in 1904 Southern echo 28th April  and by 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 8a Regent Street, Swindon, Wiltshire. Consult E_H surnames for more information

Austin Newnham Manager of branch in Southampton. Hampshire Advertiser Nov 1906 SHOLING SEAMAN’S ALLEGED FALSE PRETENCES.  consult Southampton Southern Branches P-Z above

William Edward Rush Born c1869 in London, son of Edward David Rush. William Edward RUSH managed Lennards Ltd boot shop at Southampton and then the company’s premises at 99 High Street, Winchester. In 1911 he was based in Enfield, Middlesex, and working as a boot shop assistant. consult surnames P-S 

Southend-on-Sea ESSEX Not listed in 1931

Southport, Lancashire

Houghton Street Listed in 1931 

58 Dover Road Southport 1945

Southsea, Hampshire

Southsea Mutual Boot Stores Portsmouth Evening News 01 January 1895 ad for staff at 108 Somers Road (A Lennard Bros Trading company)

108 Somers Road (west side nr Bailey Road), 1896-1917 Portsmouth Library Kellys

Southsea, 33 Kings Road, 1901-1917                                                                        

Southsea, 57 King’s Road (& Hyde Street), 1918-Listed in 1931 confirmed in 1948

Frederick Joseph Beard In 1904 he managed the Public Benefit Boot Co premises at 32 Rye Lane, Peckham in 1911 he managed the premises at 159 Highland Road, Eastney, Southsea, Portsmouth,

Edwin Charles Jackson Born 1874 at Sandgate, Kent. In 1901 he managed the company boot shop at 108 Somers Road, Southsea, Hampshire, and from 1911 until his death 10th October 1916 at the age of 42, he managed the company’s premises at 32 St Mary Street, Weymouth, Dorset, and died managing the Yeovil branch. His widow Ellen died London 1939 Consult surnames I-O for details of obituary

Joseph George Lloyd Born 1869 at Gosport, Hampshire. He worked initially as a shop assistant and from at least 1901 until 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 33 Kings Road, Southsea, Hampshire. consult surnames I-O

Spalding Lincolnshire

21 Bridge Street, 1910-1929 listed in 1931 & 1939

Frank Ford Born 7 April 1875 at 14 Lovell Street, Bristol, Gloucestershire, son of Henry FORD, a cooper originally from Witheridge, Devon. . Circa 1899-1903 manager of 7, Commercial Street Aberdare. In 1911 he managed the Public Benefit Boot Co premises at 176 City Road, Roath, Cardiff and 58 High Street Hornsey by 1914 he was managing the company’s branch at 21 Bridge Street, Spalding, Lincolnshire. His wife Florence died at Spalding in 1940 he died there in 1964

Stafford

15, Castle Street    Coventry telegraph 27 March 1958 

Stamford

Stamford: 18 high street 1911-1925 listed in 1931 & newspapers 1935

12 St John Street 1909, 1913

Harry Samuel Lenton Born 1855 at Northampton. From at least 1891 until 1911 Harry managed the company’s premises at 18 High Street, Stamford and his wife Charlotte assisted in the business. He retired in January 1928 having been manager of the Skipton Branch for 12 years.consult surnames I-O

Reuben Ling Manager of Stamford shop was involved as witness and prosecutor of a spate of robberies at the branch set out below. Three felony cases years 1910 and 1911 consult surnames I-O for full details

St. Albans Not listed in 1931

Herts Advertiser and Times Taylor & Co opens a shop in ST. Albans 29th October to 5th November 1898 between General Post office and Peahen hotel under Public Benefit Boot Company

 1899 Kellys Public Benefit occupy Peahen buildings, part of the Peahen hotel for their boot and shoe warehouse. The Peahen Hotel was rebuilt in 1899 after a devastating fire destroyed the old building

1902 Peahen Buildings London Road, narrowed down to number 4 London Road 

September 1906 Advertisement for young lady apprentice Herts Advertiser

1907  address given as Peahen Buildings London Road Herts Advertiser May 

St Austell:

Royal Cornwall gazette Oct 1893 Since my last notes were written a new shop has been opened in Fore-street by the Public Benefit Boot and Shoe Company, and their advent in St. Austell bas caused no small stir in the made-up leather trade. The blasts and counter-blasts from the printing press reminds one more of an election than anything else, and while all profess to be existing for the benefit of the public, one firm asserts that their goods have stood the test of a quarter of a century. Surely this is long enough for boots to last ! We have in St. Austell about half a score of such establishments, and if some of them can pay rent of up to £80 a year, surely the profits must be enormous.

32 Fore Street, 1897-1916     

15 Fore Street, 1916-Listed in 1931 confirmed 1935

St Blazey,

Station Road 1906-1919

St Blazey, 103 Station Road, 1929 Listed in 1931

St Ives,

Fore Street, 1896-1919

St.Ives Cornubian and Redruth Times 9th June 1910  reports sale of Fore Street shop & Premises

St Ives, High Street, 1929 Listed in 1931

Mary Wiliams Born c1857 at St Ives, Cornwall, daughter of William Williams, master shipwright, and his wife Harriet James Couch Roberts. In 1911 she was unmarried at the age of 54 and acted as an agent and manageress for Lennards Ltd premises at Fore Street, St. Ives Cornwall, as she had done for at least the previous 15 years.

St Leonards-on-Sea, 2 branches for a short time

Hastings and St.Leonards Observer  Nov 1914 adv 24 Norman Road, 1914-1920

St Leonards-on-Sea, 21 London Road (E side), 1918 Hastings Central Library-Listed in 1931 confirmed 1938 kellys

Stockport Cheshire

15 & 19 Lower Hillgate, 1883-1890 (Charles Burrow, proprietor, 1884) Slaters & Woods directories and rate books at Stockport

Northampton Mercury April 1885 William Whiteley trading as The Public Benefit Boot Company at number 19 Lower Hill gate was sued by a firm of machine manufacturers Salmon & Company of Kettering. It appears Whitely when living and carrying on a business in Leeds ordered certain machines used in the boot trade. They were sent via the Midland Railway. This occurred in November 1881. Having paid an instalment of £5 he still owed £15.11s.6d. Judgement was given for the plaintiff and Whiteley had to pay the sum owing as an immediate payment. The reason it had taken so long to get the defendant to court was he had left Leeds and despite intensive searching his whereabouts only came to light during a trade show and William Whiteley’s name was spotted

2 Princes Street 1924 Liverpool Echo

75 Prince’s Street 1934 Kellys

Found in 1966 on an old photo evidence of a Lennards branch in the new Merseyway centre built on stilts over the river Mersey that ran through the town centre.  In 2019 the premises are occupied by Natwest bank

Stowmarket, Suffolk

20 Ipswich Street, 1929 Listed in 1931 

Stratford-on-Avon,

Coventry Evening Telegraph April 1909 John Lee (36), labourer, pleaded guilty to stealing a pair of boots, the goods of the Public Benefit Boot Company, at Stratford-on-Avon on February 15. There ware two previous convictions against prisoner for similar offences In answer to the Chairman, prisoner sad he had nothing to say. He had tried to recover himself but failed. Prisoner, who had been in prison nearly two months. was sentenced to four months  imprisonment

2 High Street (Stephen Hilton, proprietor, 1885)        

Stratford-on-Avon, 39 Wood Street, 1929 Listed in 1931 & 1935

Stratford-on-Avon, 36 High Street, 1909-Listed in 1931 confirmed until 1953

Thomas Albert Carter Born 1879 at Gloucester. Thomas worked as assistant in Croydon, Surrey and in 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 36 High Street, Stratford-on-Avon. Consult surnames A-D

Stroud,

Stroud News and Gloucestershire Adv June 1886 Margaret Sims dressmaker  of Cainscross, was charged with obtaining by false pretences one pair of boots, value 3. 11d, the property of William Leonard, of the Public Benefit Boot Shop, Stroud, on May 28. Prosecutor, on being asked to be sworn, said he wished to ask permission to withdraw the case on consideration for the parents—The Chairman said it was a public prosecution, and they must hear the evidence.— Prosecutor then stated that defendant came to his shop and asked to have two pairs. of boots for Miss Barton, at Mr Hobb’s shop, as she could not get out. He did not know Miss Barton, but knew Mr Hobbs, and thought it was right. He knew the prisoner by sight, but not by name. He should have let her had the boots if she had asked for them in her own name. One pair was returned in about half an hour by a lad. George Henry Woodward, assistant to prosecutor, said that he was in the shop when defendant came in. On being questioned by the chairman be refused to answer, but was told he would have to answer all questions. put to him. He then said defendant asked for boots on approbation, which were supplied. They were asked for in Miss Barton’s name. He went to the Police Station on Saturday to see some person charged with stealing boots, and while there told P.S. White of the case. he made enquiries, at Mr Hobbs shop, and afterwards went to the Railway Station. Miss Mary Barton, assistant at Mr Hobb’s shop, said she did not send any one to Mr Leonard’s shop for boots on the day named. She did not know the defendant. and had never authorised her to use her name. P-S. White deposed that on Saturday last he received information from George Woodward that a pair of shoes had been obtained from the Public Benefit Shoe Shop on the previous day by means of false pretences. He gave witness a description of the person. On Monday he found the prisoner in Swan Street, and charged her with the offence. She admitted having the shoes, and said, ” I have been in the company of Miss Cooper and learned some of her ways. I meant to pay for the shoes” The same night she went to her father’s house at Cainscross, and searched her box and found the shoes produced. The Chairman said it was with great reluctance that the Bench dismissed the case. Mr Leonard having said that the false statement uttered by defendant did not influence him in letting her have the boots, the case must necessarily fall through. He should advise her to be very careful in the future

Stroud news & Gloucestershire Adv May 1893 ALL PERSONS of Stroud District, who have RECEIVED NOTICE OF PROSECUTION for not having their Children vaccinated, are requested to FORWARD THEIR NAMES and ADDRESSES at once to Mr. SOPER. 14, London Road, Stroud ; or to Mr. LENNARD, Public Benefit Boot Company, High Street, Stroud ; and to state how many times and what amount they hare been fined, and other particulars they may he pleased to communicate. PUBLIC ANTI-VACCINATION MEETING .JOHN STREET SCHOOLROOM, 

Gloucester Citizen Sept 1898 STROUD TO-DAY. THE NEW VACCINATION ACT. FIRST APPLICATIONS AT THE POLICE COURT. At the Stroud Police-court—before Messrs. C. H. Stanton (in the chair), Alfred Apperly, J. C. Little, Clement Ritchie, and W. Winterbotham. Considerable interest was manifested in the following applications:—George Henry Woodward, manager of the Public Benefit Boot Shop, High-street, Stroud, applied to the Bench under the New Vaccination Act, and said that he conscientiously believed that vaccination would be prejudicial to the health of his children.When prompted Mr Woodward explained as to why.  Applicant: ” when I was a child my parents had me vaccinated with seven other children. Shortly afterwards we all broke out all over, and for nine months I had to be carried about wrapped up wadding, at least my parents told me. In consequence of this I determined when I grew up not to have children vaccinated. I believe that vaccination is no good to stop small-pox. I have been to prison once, and I now ask for a certificate under the new Act. The applicant then proceeded to talk about Jenner’s discovery, and to express a doubt that inoculation from cattle was ever any good.After further examination The Chairman: Then we grant you a certificate for each child. You will have to pay Is. for each certificate.  At a later stage of the Court the applicant Woodward, addressing the Bench, said he had read through the new Act, and he could not see any authority there given for the imposition of a fee for the certificate.— The Chairman: That is quite true. There is-nothing in the Act in reference to a fee, but it has always been the custom of this Court to charge it, for all certificates issued. In doing so we are acting upon rules drawn by Quarter Sessions and approved by the Lord Chancellor. Woodward: But it is not done in other places. It has not been done at Leicester. I don’t believe in paying a fee to keep children’s blood pure.—The Chairman: yon know that the London magistrates who are a very able body of men, have agreed without one dissentient to charge a fee in each case : Well, I don’t intend to pay; I have been to prison once, and, l would prefer to go again rather than pay; any fee.. I don see why I should pay for my conscience.—The Chairman: We have nothing to do with that, I am only telling you the law. We will adjourn the consideration of this question until after the Quarter Sessions;’ and then you will hear whether you have to pay or not.—Another applicant Birt said he did not see why he should pay for liberty of conscience.—Mr. Winterbotham: You are not paying for liberty of conscience but for the trouble. Both applicants then took their certificates and left the court

Stroud News 1903 Resolved that the question of laying granolithic paving front High Street to premises occupied by the Public Benefit Boot Company in Kendrick Street be referred to the next meeting of the Committee

High Street, 1885 -1891 (William Lennard, manager, 1885-1891)                  

Stroud 5-08-1885 permission to erect a sign board at Stroud Gloucester Citizen     

Stroud, 21 High Street, 1896 

50 High Street 1897                                                                                                            

Stroud Gloucester Citizen  3 Kendrick Street/ High street 1906-Listed in 1931 confirmed 1938 & 1945

Cornelius John Fenton Born 1862 at Deptford, Kent, son of Richard Fenton, coach maker, and his wife Lucy Stilliard. In 1888 at Wem, Shropshire. He worked at various Public Benefit Boot Co branches when he was based at Stroud, Pendleton and (Pride Hill, manager in 1891) Shrewsbury. He died in 1938

George Henry Woodward  Assistant  of Stroud branch 1886. Manager of the shop in 1898 consult two Newspaper accounts above and surnames T-Z

Sunderland Added from 1931 list  Image in Gallery

Lennards Corner 85 High Street west Listed in 1931 confirmed Kellys 1934 & 1949. Burleigh Street ran between 85 high st.West and Prospect Row

Swansea, Glamorganshire 

5, 6 & 7 Victoria Arcade, 1899

Swansea, 16 Victoria Arcade, 1900-1901 

Swansea, 15 Castle Street, 1903-1938

Swansea, Lennards Corner, 1 King Edward’s Road, 1909 -Listed in 1931 confirmed 1940’s (Western Times)

Swansea, 35 St Helens Road, 1926, 1929 Listed in 1931

Herbert James Bool Born 1877 at Bristol.  At the age of 13 he worked as a shop boy at Battersea, London. From circa 1901 to 1911 he managed the company’s premises at, 16 Victoria Arcade & 1 King Edwards’ Road (Lennards Corner) Swansea, where his sister-in-law Clara Ellen Finch also worked as a shop assistant. More info surnames A-D

Clara Ellen Finch Born 1887 at Worcester, daughter of James Finch. In 1911 she worked as a boot shop assistant in the company’s premises managed by her brother-in-law, Herbert James BOOL at 1 King Street, Swansea.

SWINDON SWINDON SWINDON SWINDON SWINDON SWINDON SWINDON

Swindon,

Gloucester Citizen  June 1891 Adv. Boot Trade young smart man aged 20 required as assistant 

Wiltshire Times and Trowbridge AdvOct 1896 Mr Withy who appeared for the prosecution, against George Augustus Webb, 24, Fleet Street who was remanded on a charge of stealing 10s 4d., the monies of his employers, the Public Benefit Boot Company. 

Swindon Advertiser April 1896 Sidney Ford , 17. a youth Swindon, was brought up charged with stealing a silk handkerchief, value 1s 6d. the property Patrick McDonald, second-hand clothes dealer, of Commercial road. New Swindon, April 4th. Prisoner was further charged with stealing a pair of boots, value 6s 11d, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company the same date.—Prisoner pleaded guilty both charges. Evidence was given by Frank Murray and P C. Saunders. The latter found prisoner wearing the boots which had been missed from the shop, and he had the handkerchief pocket.— Prisoner, who was given a bad character, was commuted to goal for six weeks with hard labour three weeks on each charge

Gloucester Citizen April 1897 theft at New Swindon Petty Sessions, Monday. Albert Edward Jefferies, of Shaw, near Swindon, was charged with stealing a pair of boots, value 3s.11d., from outside the Public Benefit Boot Stores at New Swindon Saturday. The prosecutor! did not press the charge, and the man was let off on undertaking to pay the costs. The Chairman (Mr. A. D. Hulsey-Freke) condemned the practice of placing goods outside shop doors. 

Swindon Farringdon Ad. & Vale of the White Horse gazette June 1898 House Breaking, George Thomas a tramp stole £3.5s from a house consisting of coins. He then went on a spending spree, at the Public Benefit Boot shop he gave a crown piece and a shilling for boots costing 5s 11d according to the manager Arthur Mabane. At Hepworth and sons Albert Chard manager also gave evidence as to purchases there. He frequented the Volunteer inn and had a pint of beer in the Crown public house. George Thomas was committed for trial at Reading Quarter sessions

Hampshire Advertiser Dec 1899 A LENIENT PROSECUTOR. John Cooper was charged with stealing a pair of boots from the Public Benefit Boot Company’s premises, Bridge street. Samuel Hawkins, manager, identified the boots as the property of his employers. On Saturday night the prisoner and two other men came into the shop and purchased a pair of boots. As he was leaving the witness noticed that the prisoner looked bulky, and on stopping him he found the boots under his coat. The boots were worth 10s. 6d.— Prisoner pleaded guilty, and said it was all through drink.— Prosecutor did not wish to press the charge.— Fourteen days’ hard labour

Gloucester Citizen Oct 1901 Charles Nicoll, a tramp, was sent down for one month’s hard labour for stealing pair of boots value 5s. 11d., the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company on Oct. 19th. P.C. Crouch stated he saw prisoner take the boots and put them under his coat

Wilts & Gloucester Standard Jan 1903 THEFT OF BOOTS, Charles Herman, labourer, of 8, Handel-street, Gorse Hill, was brought up on charges of theft stealing a pair of boots, value 4s., the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company on December 22nd ; stealing two fowls, value 3s. 6d. the property of Hester Witts. on December 26th ; stealing 13 rods, value £1I the property .1 Messrs. Glover and Co., of Manchester. who are laying the electric cables In Swindon ; and stealing a ham, value 6s. 10d., the property of Oliver Fry. at Gorse Hill, on December 12th. The last charge was not proceeded with. Prisoner pleaded guilty and had nothing to say. except that he had worked for the G.W.R. Company for 18 years, and recently was In the employ of Messrs. Glover and Co.—Committed to gaol for two months on each charge, the sentences to run concurrent

Farringdon Advertiser May 1903 On Monday afternoon a very serious accident occurred in Bridge Street, which caused the death of Mrs Jane Smith, a widow, 84 years of age. It seems that Mr A. Gilbert, coal dealer, of Highworth, was driving a cob in a trap, accompanied by his brother. On passing Messrs Cottrell Brothers’ shop in Regent Street the horse shied at a shed arrangement covered with canvas, and bolted, Mr Gilbert, finding he could not pull the cob up, did his best to steer it through the street, which he succeeded in doing until reaching the cross streets, when the cob tried to turn, but was going at such a pace he could not get round the corner into Fleet Street, but dashed into the plate-glass window of a new shop of the Public Benefit Boot Company in Bridge Street. The shaft struck Mrs Smith and sent her through the window, and the cob went through as well. Mr Gilbert, seeing what must happen, shut his eyes and put-up his arms to save his head, and when he opened his eyes he found himself on the cob’s back and Mrs Smith by his side. The police did their best to clear the street, and directly the accident was over conveyed Mrs Smith to the Volunteer inn, where she was attended by Dr. Haddon, who found her in a state of collapse, and she did not live long. Mr Gilbert was much cut about but not seriously injured, whilst his brother got off with a shaking. The pony was also cut about the head and neck, besides sustaining other injuries, and had to be killed. The enquiry relative to the death of Mrs Smith the jury returned verdict Accidental death.” 

Salisbury Times Jan 1901 Andrew Mabane, bailed on committal, was charged that, being clerk or servant to Thos. Joseph Leonard and others. Public Benefit Boot Company, Swindon, he did feloniously and fraudulently embezzle certain sums of money in August and September. and did also falsify drivers books with intent to defraud. Six months’ imprisonment, with hard labour

Reading Mercury Oct 1903  James Paget, 45, labourer, of Swindon, was indicted for stealing a pair of boots, -value 5s, the property of Public Benefit Boot Company, at Swindon, on the 6th. Prisoner, against whom there were previous convictions, was sentenced to three months’ hard labour. The Chairman strongly condemned the practice of  ‘tradesmen exposing goods for sale outside their premises. They had no right to expose their goods as they did, and the same remark applied to butchers, who obstructed the pavement by hanging out the animals on the public highway, and if it was allowed it was only by the neglect of the local authorities in not prosecuting tradesmen for it

Farringdon Advertiser March 1906 Burglaries. —Between Saturday night and Sunday morning, the premises of Bays and Co., ironmongers. Wood Street, as  well as those occupied by the Public Benefit Boot Company, 22a Wood Street, were broken into. The houses adjoin each other and both are lock-up shops, no one residing on the premises. The entrance in each case had been effected from the back, and it is thought the depredators obtained access by climbing over the wall from the King’s Arms Hotel yard. Perpetrators ransacked Bays & co premises and gained very little. The safe was not tampered with, and this fact lends weight to the suggestion that the thieves were amateurs at the business. The shop till was forcibly broken open. None of the shop stock was in any way removed. The premises of the Public Benefit Boot Company had also been entered, a grating over the back window having been forced, apparently by a crowbar which lay near to hand. Two doors were smashed open, and, admission having been gained to the shop, the till came in for attention. Fortunately, however, the greater part of the cash had been made safe on Saturday night, and, as far can be ascertained, a few coppers amounting to about 2s, were all that was stolen.

5 Regent Circus 1895                                                                                                                  Swindon Advertiser & North Wilts. Chronicle 10th Oct. 1896 Manager tried for embezzlement of the Old Swindon branch 

22 Wood Street Old Swindon 1891-1898     

Swindon Adv., & N. Wilts Chronicle 28th November 1896 death of the Sandwich man Old Swindon branch 5 Regent Circus

Swindon Advertiser 29th December 1894 theft Bridge Street

1903 New branch Bridge Street 

23 Bridge Street,  Lennards Corner 1903- Listed in 1931, 1937-confirmed 1938 kellys 1941

Swindon, Fleet Street, 1896-1929

Regent Street

Swindon, 8a Regent Street, 1896-1915

Swindon Gloucester Citizen 4th July 1898 Fire at the Regent Street branch

Swindon, 80 Regent Street, 1920-Listed in 1931 confirmed 1938

Staff associated with Swindon

Henry Arthur Manager of the Bridge Street New Swindon branch in 1894/5

John Arthur Clapham Born 1874 at Pluckley, Kent. By the age of 16 John was a Junior boot and shoe salesman in Peasecod Street, Windsor, and by 1891 a full salesman at the branch. in 1893 he managed the branch at 39 Gloucester Road, Bishopton and afterward the branch at 90 Queens Street in Cardiff.1896 Manager of Old Swindon Branch 5, Regents Circus. In 1911 was based in Redland, Gloucestershire becoming a district inspector of Lennards Ltd branches. His daughter Dorothy became a shop assistant at one of the Lennards branches in Bristol. Consult surnames A-D

 Matthew Gregory Sandwich Board Man at the Old Swindon Branch at 5 Regent Circus Swindon. He died at the branch reported in Swindon Adv., & N. Wilts Chronicle 28th November 1896

Samuel Hawkins Manager   Hampshire Advertiser Dec 1899 consult the above case for details

Albert Hoyle Born 1879 at Bridgwater. He worked for some time at Southampton found in 1904 Southern echo 28th April  and by 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 8a Regent Street, Swindon, Wiltshire. Consult E_H surnames for more information

Arthur Mabane Manager Swindon Farringdon Ad. & Vale of the White Horse gazette June 1898 consult felony case above and surnames I-O

Andrew Mabane Salisbury Times Jan 1901 Embezzlement by Mr Mabane as clark to T. J. Lennard see above case

George Augustus Webb Embezzlement consult surnames I-O and Wiltshire Times and Trowbridge AdvOct 1896 

 

Taunton Somerset

Ernest Green manager Manager 1902 consult Surnames TZ and Newspaper report 1902

Samuel George Hawkins Born 1873 at Maldon, Essex. In 1899 at Southampton he married Anne DUFTY. At age 17 he worked as a shop assistant in Taunton and at age 25 he worked as a salesman in the Co premises at 4 & 5 Bridge Street, Southampton 1899. for more detail consult surnames E-H

Job Morris Born 1883 at Ilangedwyre, Flintshire, Wales, he married Anne EVANS in 1908 and a few years later managed the company’s premises at 38 Fore Street, Taunton, Somerset

Joseph Sherriff Scudamore Born 1866 at Llangarren, Herefordshire, son of George Scudamore. He  managed boot and shoe retail businesses in Bath and later in Taunton where he was a Borough Councillor in the 1920’s.. consult surnames P-S

A Stevens Taunton Courier & Western Advertiser Sept 1895 Taunton council ordered P.B. to remove their sign on their 39 Fore Street shop. Mr A.Stevens of Public Benefit Boot in a series of letters pointed out there were many such signs all around the town. Where is the fairness in that he asked. Full story consult the newspaper account under Taunton

P.S.Woolley Manager circa 1911 consult Newspaper report from 1911 & surnames T-Z

Taunton Courier & Western Advertiser Sept 1895 Taunton council ordered P.B. to remove their sign on their 39 Fore Street shop. Mr A.Stevens of Public Benefit Boot in a series of letters pointed out there were many such signs all around the town. Where is the fairness in that he asked.

Taunton Courier April 1902 Sarah Payne, a married woman, wife of George Payne, off St. James’s Street, Taunton, was charged with stealing a pair of boots, value 2s, the property of Messrs. Oliver, off North-street.—She pleaded guilty.—Defendant was also charged with attempting to steal the same day two pair of boots, value 4s 7d, the property off Messrs. Stead & Simpson.— Defendant pleaded not guilty.—She was further charged with stealing or about February 1st a pair of boots, value 3s 11d, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, and also pleaded not guilty to this charge.— Mr. F.S. Walkley, manager for Messrs. Oliver, said he saw the defendant take a pair of boots from outside his shop and go down North-street. He went after her and brought her back and charged her with stealing the boots. She said the child picked them up. He then gave her into the custody of P.C. Dening.— P.C Dening said he was called to Oliver’s shop by the previous witness and received the prisoner into custody on a charge of stealing the pair of boots now produced.  He then took her to the station.— Mr. W. Golding, manager for Messrs. Stead Simpson, said  on the 26th inst., he was concealed in his shop behind the ladies window, when he saw the defendant on the pavement, close to the rod of boots which were outside the window. He saw her handling the boots and untwisting the string, but just at that time the manager of the Public Benefit Boot Company came to the door, and she saw him, and at once made off. The boots were not actually removed from the hooks, but the cords were untwisted. He did not say anything to her, and saw her go down the street, but he noticed she had a child with her.—Defendant said she did not take the boots off the hook, she was only looking at them, and did not intend to steal them.— Mr. Ernest Green, manager for the Public Benefit Boot Company, also gave evidence, and said that about the 1st February, , he saw the defendant outside the shop. He was inside, and looking through the window, when saw her unhook a pair of boots, which were hanging on a rod outside, and put them under her cape then walk away in the direction of Fore-street. He could not leave the shop, he sent his errand boy after her, and he brought her back with the child and the pair of boots. He accused her of stealing them, and took them from under her She said she had not stolen them, and said the little girl picked them up from the pavement, and she was going to find out to which shop they belonged. She pleaded poverty, and having cautioned her let her go. The boots were worth 3s  11d.—The magistrates sentenced her to 14 days’ hard labour on the first and third charges, the sentences to run consecutively, and dismissed her on the second charge without the option of a fine

Taunton Courier April 1909  THEFT OF BOOTS. John Thomas, of no fixed abode, was charged with stealing a pair of boots, value 5s, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company. It seems that the defendant came to the police-station on Friday evening to obtain a ticket for the casual ward.P.C. Horner noticed he was wearing a pair of new boots, and questioned him . Subsequently the constable found out that the boots had been stolen by the defendant from outside the Public Benefit Boot Company shop. Defendant, who pleaded guilty, was sentenced to a months hard labour.

Taunton Western gazette 21st July 1911 Taunton Sidney Davey a cycle agent who also kept a stall in the market place for the sale of cycle accessories noticed one of his oil lamps suspended from the stall ‘flared up’ and as he tried to lower the flame oil dripped on him and he was set alight. He ran off amongst the crowd and no one could catch him to douse the flames. He then ran shrieking into the Public benefit shop where the staff put out the fire. Taken to hospital by the police and Mr P. S. Woolley the manager as the man was burnt severely in several places and spent a long time in hospital and is thought he will make a recovery.

39 fore Street 1897 & 1914, 1919  Kellys(this was entered under Lennards Ltd)

Taunton, 38- Fore Street, 1902-1906 listed buildings 

Taunton Courier & Western Advertiser 15th Nov. 1911 Taunton shop fire

Taunton, 11 East Street, Listed in 1931 confirmed 1938 & 1945 & 1949( a death reported at the branch)

Tavistock,

2 West Street, 1914

Tavistock, 3 West Street, 1918-1929 Listed in 1931

Teignmouth,

Teignmouth 1 Wellington Street, 1911-Listed in 1931 confirmed 1938 1940

Teignmouth, 8 Wellington Street, 1909-1929 Listed in 1931 & 1940 newspapers

Alice Clements Card Born 1866 at Tunbridge Wells. In 1890 at Tunbridge Wells she married Francis Edward VICK. In 1911 she and her husband ran the Public Benefit Boot Co branch at 1 Wellington Street, Teignmouth, Devon consult surnames A-D

James Henry Mitchelmore Born 1867 at East Allington, Devon. In 1901 he managed the company’s boot shop at 39 Gloucester Road, Bristol; in 1905 he managed the company’s large branch at The Foregate, Worcester and in 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 8 Wellington Street, Teignmouth, Devon. 1926 he was in Lawrence Hill Bristol Consult surnames I-O

Francis Edward Vick Born 1866 at Parkhurst, Isle of Wight, son of Charles Richard Vick, clerk, and his wife Mary Sayers. He married Alice Clement Card in 1896 at Tunbridge Wells, Kent, and their children included Katherine Norah  1897 and Eric Hubert 1902. In 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 1 Wellington Street, Teignmouth, Devon with his wife Alice assisting in the business. consult surnames T- Z

Thornbury, Gloucestershire Not Listed in 1931

High Street, 1910-1914 Kelly’s

Tiverton,

Exeter and Plymouth Gazette Dec 1909 At the Tiverton Borough Police-court, yesterday  William White- a tramp, was sent to prison for a month for stealing pair of boots valued 4s 11d, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company- prisoner admitted the theft, and said he took the boots because he wanted to be locked up.

Exeter and Plymouth gazette Oct 1910 William Griffiths a tramp stole a pair of boots from the P.B.B.C. shop in Tiverton to the value of 5s 11d he was committed to the quarter sessions the following Wednesday. A later appearance revealed he was a prolific thief. William Griffiths, a labourer, was brought up on remand from Saturday last, charged with stealing pair of boots  from Public Benefit Boot Company.— Supt. Mercer said that his enquiries showed that Griffiths had been convicted all over the country for various offences. He asked that defendant should sent to tie Quarter Sessions.—As accused had nothing to say, the Bench committed him for trial

52 Fore Street, 1906-1914  Listed in 1931

Frederick James Bragg Born 1871 at Bristol. From 1901 to 1906 he managed the Public Benefit branch at 43 Market Street, Falmouth in 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 52 Fore Street, Tiverton, Devon. He died in 1919 more info surnames A-D

Tonbridge

66 High Street newspapers 1935

Tonypandy 

Glamorgan Free Press 17th Dec 1898 35 Pandy Row 

35 Pandy Square, De Winton Street, 1900-1929 Listed in 1931

Tonypandy reported in Sevenoaks Chronicle & Kentish Advertiser 11th November 1910 striking miners ransack businesses in the Market square smashing windows entering the shops and throwing everything into the Street. Pub Benefit was also attacked

John Morris Born c1877 at Ruabon near Wrexham, Wales, he married Gladys Marion Fogwell in 1910  In 1901 he worked as a Cardiff boot shop assistant and in 1911 he managed the Lennards premises at 212 High Street, Exeter with his wife assisting in the business.In 1914 he  managed a company branch shop at 35 Pandy Square, Tonypandy, Glamorgan, Wales. Consult surnames I-O

Arthur Sutton
Born 1871 at Rodborough near Stroud, Gloucestershire, son of Edward Sutton  He worked firstly as a shoemaker’s assistant and by the turn of the century managed the Public Benefit Boot Co premises a 35 Pandy Square, De Winton Street, Tonypandy, Glamorgan, Wales. In 1911 he managed the company’s premises at Gloucester. consult surnames P-S 

Torquay, Devon

Torquay Times June 1900 ALLEGED WHOLESALE ‘THEFT OF SHOES.. Ellen Bowden, a married woman of Melville Street, was brought up in custody charged with stealing six pairs of shoes, value 17s. 4d. the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company. Mr. T. Brewer, manager of the Public Benefit Boot establishment, said he had been missing shoes from the hooks, from which they were usually suspended outside the shop, for several days. On one occasion two pairs were taken, and on others single pairs. On the theft of the sixth pair he communicated with the police. Detective Gregory stated that he apprehended the prisoner at her home on Tuesday evening, and brought her to the police station, where he charged her with stealing four pairs of shoes. She replied “I bought a pair of shoes at the Public Benefit shop some little time ago with a five shilling piece my sister sent me as a present.” Witness found the missing shoes pledged with Mr. Wills, pawnbroker, of Market Street. William Madge, assistant to Mr. T’. H. Willis, pawnbroker, Market Street, said one pair of shoes were pledged by the prisoner’s daughter, on May 21st. The other pairs were brought by women called Satterley and Bryant, and pledged in the prisoner’s name. Prisoner was remanded in custody until Thursday

Torquay times April 1901 The Torquay Early Closing Association Cricket Club, which was started last year, will this scum, only run a Wednesday team. Mr. R. L. Brewer the manager of the Public Benefit Boot Company, is the enterprising secretary. He has arranged matches with Paignton St. John’s, Brixham, Britannia, and Upton. The club will probably play their home engagement’s at the Recreation Ground

Torquay Times April 1905  J. A. PAGE, THE LOCAL MANAGER of the Public Benefit Boot Company, Union Street, has been awarded the bronze medal in the recent open window-dressing competition organised by the Boot and Shoe Trades’ Journal. There were over 400 competitors, and only four awards

Torquay Times June 1908 Obstruction —Overhanging Boots and James A. Page. 34, manager, of the Public Benefit Boot Company’s shop in Union Street was summoned for obstructing the footpath. P.C. Ridgeway stated that on the 13th. ult., at 6.45, saw a number of pairs of boots hanging from a rod outside the window the shop. They were overhanging the footpath to the extent of seven inches. He called the manager’s attention to the obstruction, but the boots were not removed. Defendant said the rod from which the boots wore hanging had been there for thirteen years, and action had been taken. The rod was modified and he did not think it now hung over the footpath at all. If it did it would be removed. Mr. A. Howell, the Town Clerk’s Office said defendant was written to on the subject in October last. Superintendent Roberts said he would be content with a promise that the obstruction would be removed. Defendant gave promise to remove it; and the Bench dismissed the case on the pavement of 6s. 6d. costs. John Alexander George, 33, manager of Messrs. Stead and Simpson’s warehouse in Union Street was similarly summoned. P.C Ridgeway gave evidence which was of a similar nature to that in the preceding case. Stead and Simpson followed suit and offered to rectify the problem on payment of costs. Further cases William Alfred Trueman, 35 of The Eclipse Boot and Shoe Co & Donald Roberts Gooding 40 manager for Messrs Oliver & Co. were similarly dealt with. (Obviously a purge)

20 Union Street, C 1890-1897 then confirmed by Kellys -1913

Torquay 18-20 Union Street, Lennards Corner 1911-1980 also added from the 1931 listing

Torquay, 45 Union Street, 1929

Mr T. Brewer Torquay Local manager 1900 consult surnames A-D & newspaper report above 1900 & 1901

James Ashdown Page Born 1868 at Northchurch, Hertfordshire, son of Edward George PAGE. He managed the company’s premises on Union Street, Torquay, Devon, from at least 1901 until 1911.  Consult surnames P-S and the felony cases above 1905 & 1908

Arthur George Pearce
Born 1881 at Turnham Green, Middlesex, son of Thomas Pearce, a London metropolitan police constable originally from St Columb Major, and his wife Mary. Around 1901 he was a Torquay boot dealer’s assistant. He married Emily Matilda Perrott in 1904 at Newton Abbot, where he was likely to have been an assistant. In 1914 he managed the company’s branch at 8 Queen Street, Newton Abbot. consult surnames P-S 

Totnes, DEVON

Totnes Weekly Times 27th August 1898 Theft from shop.

Totnes 10 High Street, 1911-1929 Listed in 1931

John Butson Born 1847 at Crediton, He was a boot dealer and by 1911 he had retired and his two daughters carried on the boot dealership at 10 High Street, Totnes consult surnames A-D

G. Hodnett Manager of Totnes Branch 

Tredegar, Monmouth 

18 Castle Street 1880’s

38 Castle Street, 1901-1929 listed in 1931

William North Born 1852 at Tredegar, Monmouthshire In 1877 he married Mary Emma Jenkins and their children included Rosa Mabel 1878, Joseph Harold 1880, George Arthur 1882, Muriel Dora M 1885, William Stuart 1886, Hugh Gordon 1888, Basil 1891, Violet 1893 and Irene 1894. William followed his father into the boot trade and by 1891 he managed the boot shop at 18 Castle Street and from at least 1891 to 1911 he managed the Public Benefit Boot Co premises at 38 Castle Street, Tredegar

George Arthur North

Born 1882 at Tredegar, Monmouthshire, Wales, son of William North, boot shop manager, and his wife Mary Emma North neeJenkins. In 1911 he worked as a boot shop assistant in his father’s business at Tredegar.

Trowbridge, Wiltshire

Wiltshire Times and Trowbridge Advertiser Mr Albert Taylor Began his working life as an apprentice with the P.B.Boot co. under Mr Arthur Pascall. After his apprenticeship Mr Taylor moved onto another firm

Bath Chronicle & Weekly Gazette  December 1898, 1899-1929 listed in 1931 at 30 Fore Street & 1942 & 1956(Adv for staff

Truro

Royal Cornwall Gazette Oct 1893 Wilfred Bawden of Richmond Terrace a lad in the employ of the Public benefit Boot Company was charged with unlawfully trundling a hoop on the pavement in St.Nicholas Street. Defendant pleaded not guilty.Supt. Angel said the defendant did not appear to think he was doing any harm yet he was running at a rapid pace.  The bench said as the defendant was civil when he was spoken to by the superintendent  he would be ordered to pay the costs only which were 3s 6d. they hoped this would warn others off the practice of hoop trundling as it was getting common. A penalty under the bye laws which could be imposed was £5

West Briton and Cornwall Adv. May 1903 A Raid on India Rubber Heels. Stephen Clemens, of Fairmantle.-street, a boy, was charged with stealing a pair of India rubber heels, value 1s the property of Mr. Charles Barrett, boot dealer, of Cathedral lane, Truro. Albert Humphries, another boy, of Gae-hill, was charged with receiving them, well knowing them to have been stolen. Wm. Taylor, aged 16, an errand boy in the employ of the Public Benefit Boot Company, said that on Wednesday last. 6th inst., he saw the defendant, Clemens, outside Dyer’s brush factory when Clemens showed him a pair India rubber heels. He said ” “These are the sort that you can only get at our place”. He asked witness whether he would try and sell them for him. He told witness that he got them at Mr. Barrett’s factory. Clemens was an errand boy at Mr. Barett’s shop. Later in the day he saw the defendant Humphries and snowed him the heels. he told Humphries he received the heels from Clemens. Humphries gave him 2d. for them, and later on saw Clemens and handed it to him. Clemens gave him a halfpenny for himself. Sergt. Brokenshire stated that on Thursday, .from information received, be went and saw the defendant, Albert Humphries, who had the pair of heels in his possession . Defendant stated that be bought them from Taylor. Witness arrested Humphries, who at first denied that he knew the heels were stolen. He also arrested Clemens. Mr Charles Barrett, boot and shoe dealer, of Cathedra! Lane, said that Stephen Clemens was an errand boy in his employ. The value of the heels was a shilling. He thought that the boy Clemens had been misled. He wished to forgive him, and had taken him back into bis employ. He would keep him in his service with the greatest confidence. …….The story winds on with more boys involved …..William Taylor, Frederick Taylor (cousins) both of Calenic Street and Albert Garrod of Charles Street  were charged with stealing and receiving two pairs of India Rubber heels value 2s from Public Benefit Boot Company. Robert Prowse an assistant at the P.BBCo shop said William Taylor was an errand boy at the shop. All the lads were fined and one was birched and fined

Royal Cornwall gazette Oct 1904 Edwin Rawlings, an elderly cripple, of Old ridge-street, was charged at the Truro City Police-court this morning with receiving a quantity of leather from Sydney Carveth. during the past three weeks, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company. Chief Constable Pearce asked that prisoner be remanded until Monday in custody. He was apprehended on Tuesday by P.C. Brokenshire on a charge of receiving four India rubber heels from an errand boy at the Public Benefit Boot Co.’a shop, and from investigations made by the police there was no doubt he had suggested to the boy that he should steal them, at least so (the Chief Constable) had been informed, and had been receiving them and selling them to other people. He had traced all the heels, and prisoner was bailed out. but it had since been ascertained that he had also received pieces of leather soles and various other things, such as packages of groceries, bottles of scent, umbrellas, etc., and it was necessary further inquiries should be made. —Prisoner said that all the Chief Constable had said was true. He did not know how he came to such a thing he was remanded in custody until Monday

Royal Cornwall Gazette April 1908 Miss Warwick, of Bosvigo, was driving through Nicholas street a pony & trap on Saturday afternoon, when the pony became restive. Mrs. Furse. of the Public Benefit Boot Company, was struck by the vehicle, and knocked through Mr. lake’s shop window, and was conveyed to the Royal Cornwall Infirmary

Truro Royal Cornwall Gazette 22nd August 1901 Tenders for the building of new premises on the corner of King Street and Boscawen Street. The firm of Sutton Building yard Plymouth would build the new premises for £2,257 designed by Slivanus Trevall with the width of King Street increased to 36 feet

Truro Western Morning news 13 Sept 1900 At a council meeting Public Benefit Boot Company put forward a letter offering to the council to accept £500 for 180 Superficial feet of ground on the corner of King Street. The offer was rejected the council demanded £600. The architect Mr Trevall also demanded the council stated the ‘frontage line’. 

Truro Boscawen and King streets HSBC bank once the fit for purpose rebuilt branch of Public Benefit Boot company.

Truro 1900 West Briton and Cornwall advertiser 13 December 1900 gift of enamel tin –biscuits. Every Xmas the annual ‘give away took place at all Southern branches

Cnr King Street & Boscawen Street, 1893-1897 

16 Boscawen Street, 1902 -1919              2 St Nicholas Street, 1920-listed in 1931 confirmed 1938  & 1945                   

 

Mrs Furse Royal Cornwall Gazette April 1908 Miss Warwick, of Bosvigo, was driving through Nicholas street Truro a pony & trap on Saturday afternoon, when the pony became restive. Mrs. Furse. of the Public Benefit Boot Company, was struck by the vehicle, and knocked through Mr. lake’s shop window, and was conveyed to the Royal Cornwall Infirmary

Robert Prowse Assistant Very in depth newspaper report with a story that winds on with more boys involved …..William Taylor, Frederick Taylor (cousins) both of Calenic Street and Albert Garrod of Charles Street  were charged with stealing and receiving two pairs of India Rubber heels value 2s from Public Benefit Boot Company. Robert Prowse an assistant at the P.BBCo shop said William Taylor was an errand boy at the shop. All the lads were fined and one was birched and fined. Excerpt only consult Truro Southern Branches P-Z above

William Taylor (Connected to the story above)West Briton and Cornwall Adv. May 1903 A Raid on India Rubber Heels. Stephen Clemens, of Fairmantle.-street, a boy, was charged with stealing a pair of India rubber heels, value 1s the property of Mr. Charles Barrett, boot dealer, of Cathedral lane, Truro. Albert Humphries, another boy, of Gae-hill, was charged with receiving them, well knowing them to have been stolen. Wm. Taylor, aged 16, an errand boy in the employ of the Public Benefit Boot Company, said that on Wednesday last. 6th inst., he saw the defendant, Clemens, outside Dyer’s brush factory when Clemens showed him a pair India rubber heels. Excerpt consult Truro Southern branches P-Z

Wadebridge, Cornwall Not Listed in 1931

Molesworth Square, 1905-1919

Wesley Nancarrow Born 1865 at Summercourt, St Enoder, Cornwall. 1906 he managed the Public Benefit Boot Co branch in Honey Street, Bodmin. By 1914 he managed businesses in Wadebridge and Redruth. consult surnames I-O 

Wallsend -On-Tyne Added from 1931 List

45 High Street West 1911 Listed in 1931 confirmed Kellys 1934

Wellingborough Added from 1931 List

25 Silver street listed in 1931

45 High Street West 1934 & 1938

Wells,

Central Somerset Gazette Feb 1917  The military representative successfully appealed against the exemption of three months granted by the Wells City Tribunal to Messrs. Lennards, Ltd., who had applied for the ex, emption of their manager of the Wells and Glastonbury shops, Edwin Percy Grigg, (28), married, of 10, High-street, Wells. The firm stated that the man managed their two shops in which they had two lady assistants, and supervised the repairing shop. Grigg also had applied for exemption on domestic grounds. After consultation the Appeal Tribunal upheld the appeal of the Military Representative and altered the time granted to March 15th. Mr Grigg and his family lived above the shop

Central Somerset Gazette June 1923  An application by Mews. Lennards Ltd. and by Mr. Collihole to affix signs projecting over the pavement was considered, and the Surveyor reporting that the height above the pavement was ample, leave was given subject to the security of the fixing being approved by the Surveyor

Wells Journal May 1926 Bowls Match Wells v Lennards Ltd of Bristol. The City .of Wells Bowling Club opened its match programme, on Tuesday, when a team representative of Messrs. Leonards, Ltd., Bristol .was entertained. The visitors who were only able provide sufficient players for three rinks, were soundly beaten on each, losing the match by no less a margin than points. Details;— Wells, Rink I.—l Messrs. A. Mills. E, W. George, J. T. Monelle. E. W. (skip) Rink 2. Messrs. W. James, E. W. King, S. H. Cooke J. Batstone (skip), Rink 3. Messrs. J. Pavey, H. F. Ginger. J. O. Ceilings, E. Stiles (skip) 25 Total 84 Lennards. Rink 1. —Messrs. A. Thomas. F. Follingham, A. West. W. Parminster (skip) Rink 2. —-Messrs. Naylor. E. Andrews, J. Swanboro, W. Nicholas (skip). Rink 3.—Messrs. W. Keyes, F. Papweil. G. Jones, W. Farr (skip) This match has been included because it contains lots of Lennards employees!!

19 High Street, 1911-1929 listed in 1931& 1935 & 1945

Edwin Percy Grigg Manager of two branches Wells and a repair facility Central Somerset Gazette Feb 1917. Military tribunal for more detail consult Surnames E-H for full biographical details

John Kingsbury Born c1839 at Redcliff, Bristol. In 1911 at the age of 72, he managed the company premises at 19 High Street, Wells, Somerset. He died at Wells in 1916 aged 77.

Welshpool 

36 Broad Street Established ?? but sold in Feb/March 1962 to Woolworths currently M.& Co. in 2018

Weston-super-Mare Somerset 

Weston Super Mare Gazette   Dec 1897            SHORT NOTICE. M. OLIVER, BOOT RETAILER, 3 MEADOW STREET, having: DISPOSED of his business to The Public Benefit Boot Company, intends CLEARING THE WHOLE OF HIS RELIABLE STOCK AT LESS THAN COST PRICES LAST DAY: TO-DAY (SATURDAY), DEC. 11.

Shepton mallet journal Aug 1904 WESTON SUPER-MARE. Another FIRE. —For the third time within a few months a fire has occurred in Weston-super- Mare. First of all, Wreford’s premises in Oxford-street a bakery was the scene of a conflagration ; then, in May, came the very serious and sad affair at Huntley’s Priory Restaurant ; and now, yet another similar fire is reported, this time at Price’s Bakery in Regent-street. It appears that, shortly before eight o’clock Sunday night, fire broke out in the storehouse, situated over the oven at Price’s Bakery—a somewhat similar location to that in which was the inception of the Priory fire, be it noted—and had the outbreak not been quickly discovered, the consequences might very possibly have been of very serious nature, as the premises are situated in the narrow part of the street, being entered at the back from Meadow-street. A young man named Bryant, who works for the Public Benefit Boot Company, jointly with three police constables, worked hard to keep the flames down with buckets of water, until the arrival of the brigade. In half an hour, so prompt were the measures taken, the fire was got under, without any very great damage to the premises, but to the destruction of a large quantity of flour. The peculiar circumstances of the fire caused immense excitement in the town, which is now very full of visitors, and eager crowds of people congregated in Regent-street and Meadow-street, whence they watched the operations of the brigade with the keenest interest

50 Regent Street, 1902-1909

Weston-super-Mare, 3 Meadow Street, 1903-1914

Weston-super-Mare, 47 Regent Street, 1910-1912

Weston-super-Mare, 2 Meadow  1909, 1914, 1919, 1929, listed in 1931 Lennards List

41 Regent Streets, 1913 1919, 1932 

Weston-super-Mare, 41-43-45 Regent Street Lennards Corner, 1929-listed in 1931 confirmed 1932 & 1938

Mr Bryant assistant at Weston super mare meadow street helped to extinguish a major fire at the branch consult surnames A-D

William Ernest FearBorn 27 November 1895 at Weston Super Mare, Somerset, son of Charles Fear, County Court Bailiff, and his wife Frances (Fanny) Mary House. He worked in the company’s Weston Super Mare premises as a shop assistant and served in WWI. In 1922 at Newport, Monmouthshire, he married Edith M Thomas and they had a daughter Frances L Fear 1923 and may have worked in the Newport branch at this time.

Ernest Jesse Keveren Born 1871 at Gloucester. His eldest brother Arthur George Keveren was a boot salesman and Ernest followed him into the trade. In the mid-1890s Ernest was based in Weston-Super-Mare, Somerset and in South Wales; in 1898 he managed the Public Benefit Boot Co shop at 88 Fisherton Street, Salisbury, after which he managed the company premises at The Cross, Worcester. 

West Stanley Added from 1931 list

5 Town Hall Buildings listed in 1931

Front Street 1934

Weymouth, Dorset 

 Southern Times And Dorset Herald 1893  PUBLIC BENEFIT BOOT STORES ARE NOW OPEN. 36, ST. MARY – STREET, (LATELY PIDGEON’S GROCERY* STORES). THESE Grand Premises, to which has been removed the Business lately carried on at 91, St. Mary-street, are replete with every comfort and facility for doing a large Trade—ENORMOUS STOOK, GREAT VARIETY,  LADIES’ LAVATORY. &c. MORTON’S BOOTS Are all over the Kingdom  

Western Gazette 23rd December 1898 at 3 Bridge buildings, St Thomas Street Weymouth 

Weymouth 32 St Mary Street, 1909-listed in 1931 confirmed 1938 

Edwin Charles Jackson Born 1874 at Sandgate, Kent. In 1901 he managed the company boot shop at 108 Somers Road, Southsea, Hampshire, and from 1911 until his death 10th October 1916 at the age of 42, he managed the company’s premises at 32 St Mary Street, Weymouth, Dorset, and died managing the Yeovil branch. His widow Ellen died London 1939 Consult surnames I-O for details of obituary

Whitley Bay Added from 1931 List

192 Whitley Road listed in 1931 confirmed Kelly’s 1934 & 1941

Widnes Added from 1931 List

Lennards Corner 69 Widnes Road listed in 1931

Wigan added from 1931 list

15-16 Standishgate listed in 1931

14-15 Mackinson Arcade listed in 1931 & 1935

28 Mackinson Arcade listed in 1931 & 1935

Winchester

Winchester High Street a branch of the Mutual Stores established by Lennards

Advertisement for a strong boy as porter and sandwich board 1895 apply Lennards Ltd

Hampshire Chronicle 24th December 1898 99 High Street Winchester

Winchester, 99 High Street, 1900-1929 listed in 1931

William Joseph Bush Born 1867 at Shirley, Hampshire. In 1891 he worked as a boot shop assistant in Southampton and from circa 1901 until 1913 he managed the premises at 99 High Street, Winchester consult surnames A-D

William Henry Crute Born 1891 at Winchester, Hampshire, son of Emily Kate CRUTE, laundress. In 1911 he worked in the company’s Winchester premises as a boot shop assistant. In WWI, he served as a private in the Hampshire Regiment and was killed in action in Belgium on 4 September 1918 aged 27.

William Edward Rush Born c1869 in London, son of Edward David Rush. William Edward RUSH managed Lennards Ltd boot shop at Southampton and then the company’s premises at 99 High Street, Winchester. In 1911 he was based in Enfield, Middlesex, and working as a boot shop assistant. consult surnames P-S 

Windsor

Windsor & Eton Express Sept 1905  SOME CURIOUS REVELATIONS. at the Windsor Bankruptcy Court on Saturday last, before Mr. Registrar O. W. Last, Leonard Thomas Riches and his mother, Lucy Tow (widow), the former lately trading in partnership with his mother at 142, Peascod-street, as boot retailers, came up for public examination in bankruptcy, under a receiving order dated July 29th last, the petitioning creditors being the Leicester Slipper Company, of Leadenhall-street, Leicester, boot and shoe manufacturers. The business of a boot retailer at 142 and 143, Peascod-street, was first commenced 28 years ago by Mr. Tow, the husband of the debtor, Lucy Tow. He died in 1884, when his wife took to the business. In October, 1902, Riches entered into partnership with his mother, and in March last the business was sold to Messrs. Leonard, Ltd. for £250, in addition to which the purchasers paid off a mortgage of £500 for number 142. The house and shop of number 142 was freehold number 143 was leasehold. Riches and his mother were approached 3-4 years previously by Mr Lennard to buy the business and when debts began mounting up the business was sold to him after rejecting his first offer of £200 plus £500 to pay off the mortgage. Lennard increased the amount to £250 plus £500 to gain immediate possession. He sent a man round the following day to oversee the arrangement. Leonard Thomas Riches was retained by Lennard as manager on 25s a week, this was increased to 30s more recently as he was still the manager. Mrs Tow sent all the furniture to her daughter in Margate a business woman and she purchased it to help her mother pay off debts. Fascinating story of how T.J. Lennard of Lennards ltd secured a valuable property within sight of the Castle a major tourist attraction, and on a leading thoroughfare.

Reading Mercury Jan 1911 Donald Stewart 48 a  labourer, pleaded guilty to stealing lady’s bicycle. valued £lO. the property of Edith Scherer Prisoner pleaded guilty. Mr Sturgess said prisoner took the bicycle from outside a shop in Castle-hill. Prisoner was also charged with stealing boots, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, and to this charge he also pleaded guilty. P c Baker, of the Oxford Constabulary. proved a previous conviction against prisoner m 1904, for stealing bacon at Bicester. Chief Constable Carter said prisoner formerly lived near Reading and he bad over 20 previous convictions altogether. He had never known him to do much work. Prisoner joined the Army and went out to the South African War 1900. At Bloemfontein, he left his post and was found drunk, and he was sentenced to two year imprisonment. He was sent home to complete his sentence. In answer to the Recorder prisoner said bad been five years in a Reformatory. The Recorder said prisoner had a bad record, and could not serve less than a sentence of twelve months’ hard labour

142-143 Peasecod Street (west side), 1891-1950 (Lucy Tow, proprietor, 1891-1901; Listed in 1931   In 1901 her son Leonard Thomas Riches was manager of the business

John Arthur Clapham Born 1874 at Pluckley, Kent. By the age of 16 John was a Junior boot and shoe salesman in Peasecod Street, Windsor, and by 1891 a full salesman at the branch. in 1893 he managed the branch at 39 Gloucester Road, Bishopton and afterward the branch at 90 Queens Street in Cardiff. 1896 Manager of Old Swindon Branch 5, Regents Circus. In 1911 was based in Redland, Gloucestershire becoming a district inspector of Lennards Ltd branches. His daughter Dorothy became a shop assistant at one of the Lennards branches in Bristol. Consult surnames A-D

Leonard Herbert David Collins Born 1881 at Trowbridge, Wiltshire, 1911 he managed premises at 142-143 Peasecod Street, Windsor, Berkshire consult surnames A-D

Frank Dunn Born 1878 at Sturry, Kent, son of John Dunn. In 1901 he worked as a boot salesman assistant at the Public Benefit Boot Co premises on Peasecod Street, New Windsor, Berkshire.

Lucy Goodwin Born abt 1839 at Datchet, Buckinghamshire, daughter of Thomas Goodwin, . 7. From at least 1891 until 1901 she was the proprietor of the Public Benefit Boot Co premises at 142-143 Peasecod Street, Windsor. In 1901 her son Leonard Thomas Riches was manager of the business She died in 1915 aged 76. consult surnames E-H for more details

Edith Rachel Jones   In 1901 she worked as a shop assistant at the Public Benefit Boot Co premises on Peasecod Street, New Windsor, Berkshire.

Percival Henry Claude Martin 
 Born 1880 at Maidstone, Kent. In 1901 he worked as a boot salesman assistant at the Public Benefit Boot Co premises on Peasecod Street, New Windsor, Berkshire. He served in WWI with the R.A.F consult surnames I-O

Ernest George Meech Born 1878 at Eastcott. In 1901 he worked as a boot salesman assistant at the Public Benefit Boot Co premises on Peasecod Street, New Windsor…..  in 1917 he enlisted and was sent to France with the Honourable Artillery Company. He died in France a few months later aged 38 consul surnames I-O

Leonard Thomas Riches Born 1862 at London, son of Francis Bloye Riches. In 1901 he managed the Public Benefit Boot Co premises in conjunction with his mother at 143-143 Peascod Street, Windsor, Berkshire. In 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 30 Cornhill, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. Consult surnames P-S

Winton, Dorset See Bournemouth

Worcester, Worcestershire

Worcester Chronicle April 1899 NOTES BY OBSERVER. Rapid progress is being made with the new hop warehouses in the rear of the Hop Pole Hotel. As regards the latter, I hear that an effort is being made to bring about a revision of the plans which have been adopted by the Guardians. These provide, it will be remembered, for setting back the front of the hotel, and of the two shops occupied by Mr. Martin, in line with the National Provincial Bank and the premises of the Public Benefit Boot Company; those of Messrs. Anderson and Virgo to be also eventually similarly set back when terms are arranged. New plans involved setting back the frontages further still and widening the road by many feet.

Worcester Chronicle July 1899  Stolen. Boots.—Annie Savers (28), 5, Dent street, was charged by Herbert Ball, 5, Castle Place, Edgar street, manager for the Public Benefit Boot Co., with stealing from outside that shop, 28, Shambles, two boy’s boots, value 2s. 11d on June 24. Frank Jones, assistant at the shop, stated that on the date in question about 10.15 at night in consequence of what Ada Bellamy told him he went to the Shambles and there saw prisoner opposite Messrs. Hall’s shop with a perambulator. Witness watched her and saw her take from it the boots produced. Witness went up to her and told her that they belonged to the Boot Co. She said she had no boots, and then went off. Witness followed her into Silver street, and then gave information to P.C. Hawker. Witness had previously missed the boots from outside the shop. Cross-examined: The boots were fastened to the shop front by string, which had been broken. Ada Bellamy, 8 Court, Copenhagen street, stated that, she saw the prisoner cross the street, take the boots, and put them in her perambulator, covering them with a shawl. P.C. Hawker deposed to arresting the prisoner. She had the boots under her arm, and upon witness asking her how she got them, she said “I didn’t take them from the Public  Benefit Boot shop in the Shambles.” Prisoner was drunk. She now pleaded guilty. The Bench decided, as it was her first offence, to deal leniently with prisoner, and fined her 20s, or 14 days

Evesham Standard West Midland Observer Nov 1899 George Bevan a reservist in the 5th Dragoon Guards was called up to fight in the Boer war he was a porter at the Public benefit Boot co

Herbert Ball, 5, Castle Place, Edgar street, manager for the Public Benefit Boot Co., with stealing from outside that shop, 28, Shambles, in 1899

Clarence Burgoyne Finch Born 1893 at Worcester, son of James FINCH, button manufacturer, and his wife Mary Lucy Mogford. In 1911 he worked as a boot shop assistant at the Public Benefit Boot Co premises in Worcester. In WWI, he served as a Lance Corporal with the 14th Battalion Welsh Regiment and was killed in action in France on 10 July 1916 aged 22

Ethel May Finch Born 1882 at Worcester, daughter of James Finch, button manufacturer, and his wife Mary Lucy MOGFORD. In 1901 she worked as a boot shop assistant at the Public Benefit Boot Co premises in Worcester before marrying Herbert James Bool who at the time managed the company’s branch at Swansea. .

Frank Jones Assistant at Worcester shop: Mentioned in the Worcester Chronicle July 1899  Stolen. Boots. Herbert Ball, 5, Castle Place, Edgar street, manager for the Public Benefit Boot Co., with stealing from outside that shop, 28, Shambles, consult the full story  above

Ernest Jesse Keveren Born 1871 at Gloucester. His eldest brother Arthur George Keveren was a boot salesman and Ernest followed him into the trade. In the mid-1890s Ernest was based in Weston-Super-Mare, Somerset and in South Wales; in 1898 he managed the Public Benefit Boot Co shop at 88 Fisherton Street, Salisbury, after which he managed the company premises at The Cross, Worcester.

James Henry Mitchelmore Born 1867 at East Allington, Devon. In 1901 he managed the company’s boot shop at 39 Gloucester Road, Bristol; in 1905 he managed the company’s large branch at The Foregate, Worcester and in 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 8 Wellington Street, Teignmouth, Devon. 1926 he was in Lawrence Hill Bristol Consult surnames I-O

William Tom Griffiths Preece Born 1894 at Sutton, Herefordshire, son of John Charles Preece. At the age of 16 he worked as a boot shop assistant at the company’s Worcester premises. He served in World War I consult surnames P-S 

Worcester Chronicle 2nd September 1893 ad for staff P.B. The Cross, Foregate Worcester

Worcester The Foregate, (E side), 1896 Worcester Gloucestershire Echo 14th august 1899 The Cross &  28 the Shambles 

Worcester, The Cross, 1901- 1929 listed in 1931 Lennards Corner & 1949, 1958 Confirmed: Coventry telegraph 27 March 1958 

Worcester, 28 Shambles, 1899-1912, 1916 (next to the New Market Inn which in turn is next to the Meat and Vegetable Market)

Worthing,  Not listed in 1931

Presence proven to be established in circa 1901

13 Montague Street, 1953-1975

William Richard Pagett Born 1868 at Kidderminster, Worcestershire, son of Eli Pagett, boot-maker, and his wife Betsy. He worked initially in local carpet works but by the 1890’s he had followed his father into the boot trade. In the mid-1890’s he managed the Public Benefit Boot Co branch at 6 Church Gate, Loughborough. By 1901 he was managing a boot shop in Worthing, Sussex and in 1911 he managed a boot shop at Westbourne, Bournemouth. consult surnames P-S

Yarmouth 

Yarmouth Independent Jan 1934 Gorleston branch Lennards Ltd Church Lane

Yeovil

Western daily Press Feb 1899  YEOVIL. At the borough police court on Friday. Frederick James Reed appeared, on bail, on a charge of stealing two pairs of shoes, the property of the Public Benefit Boot Company, valued at 10s. ‘After hearing evidence prisoner was fined £5. 

Western Chronicle Jan 1902 Property Prices. Property in the principal streets of Yeovil sell, in comparative sense, for almost fabulous prices. Monday’s Leader it was reported that the house and premises, No. 12, Middle Street, Yeovil, lately occupied by Mr. C. Hull, ironmonger, had been sold, for £2,250. In the spring of 1898, the premises now occupied by the Public Benefit Boot Company, and previously the Wilts and Dorset Bank, fetched £3,800 at public auction.

Western Chronicle Feb 1903 The son of Mr Foot a painter from Kingston employed by the Public Benefit Boot Company slipped from some steps, fracturing his wrist but he is progressing favourably

Hull Daily Mail 8th October 1897 at the 7, High Street Yeovil branch  

Yeovil Western Gazette Yeovil 7 High Street, 1902-listed in 1931 confirmed 1939 & 1945

Yeovil Western Gazette -death of Edwin Charles Jackson manager of the branch 10th October 1916 Consult surnames I-O for obituary

William James Moss  Born 1878 at Cheltenham. In 1901 he worked as an assistant in the boot shop in Yeovil, Somerset, and in 1911 he managed the company’s premises at 9 Union Street, Plymouth, Devon.

Frederick James Reed Assistant at the Yeovil branch at 7, High Street cited in 27th January 1899 Western gazette for embezzlement